Boeing, Airbus and Embraer to collaborate on aviation biofuels

“There are times to compete, and there are times to co-operate,” says Boeing CEO Jim Albaugh.

Jim Albaugh, president and CEO of Boeing, at the Aviation and Environment Summit on March 22, 2012 in Geneva, Switzerland. Credit: Getty Images

 

The airframe manufacturers Boeing Company, Airbus and Embraer have signed a collaboration agreement  to work with governments and biofuel producers in developing affordable aviation biofuels.

The companies, which are affiliate members of the Sustainable Aviation Fuel Users Group, agreed to increase the availability of sustainable new jet fuel sources.

Jim Albaugh, president and CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes, said: “There are times to compete and there are times to co-operate. Two of the biggest threats to our industry are the price of oil and the impact of commercial air travel on our environment. By working with Airbus and Embraer on sustainable biofuels, we can accelerate their availability and reduce our industry’s impacts on the planet we share.”

Tom Enders, president and CEO of Airbus, said: “We’ve achieved a lot in the past ten years in reducing our industry's carbon footprint – a 45 per cent traffic growth with only 3 per cent more fuel consumption.”

The agreement supports the reduction of the industry’s carbon emissions, as well as halving industry emissions by 2050 based on 2005 levels.

Enders added: “The production and use of sustainable quantities of aviation biofuels is key to meeting our industry’s ambitious carbon-reduction targets and we are helping to do this through research and technology, our expanding network of worldwide value chains and supporting the EU commission towards its target of 4 per cent of biofuel for aviation by 2020.”

Paulo Cesar Silva, president of commercial aviation at Embraer, said: “We are all committed to take a leading role in the development of technology programs that will facilitate aviation biofuels development and actual application faster than if we were doing it independently. Few people know that Brazil's well-known automotive biofuels program started within our aeronautical research community, back in the 1970s, and we will keep on making history.”