Nobel Peace Prize awarded to the EU

Not quite as weird as it seems. But still pretty weird.

The 2012 Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to the European Union.

The decision is not as bizarre as one might think. There is a precedent for organisations winning the prize – the international atomic energy association won in 2005, for instance – and the EU, although it is largely forgotten now, was formed with the aim of making war in Europe not just unthinkable, but materially impossible.

Its aims have certainly been achieved. The continent has gone from one which was torn apart by war twice in half a century, having undergone few years of peace in its entire history, to one which has earned an unprecedented lack of violent struggle – internally, at least.

Nonetheless, for all that the award may be appropriate in the big picture, the question as to why it was awarded now is more unclear. The past couple of years have not been the best in the EU's history, certainly, and the eurocrisis has made a break-up of the union possible for almost the first time since it was founded. Adding to the strangeness is the fact that the Peace Prize is the only one awarded by Norway, rather than Sweden – and Norway isn't even a member of the EU.

The EU flag. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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David Cameron calls Sadiq Khan a “proud Muslim” – after trying to link him to Islamic extremism

The PM has his best flipflops on.

After months of backing the nasty racial politics of the Tory mayoral campaign, the Prime Minister has taken the bold move of sharing a platform with infamous moderate Sadiq Khan on the EU Remain campaign trail. Quite a spectacular about-turn.

Compare and contrast, readers.

David Cameron, 20 April 2016

“If we are going to condemn not just violent extremism, but also the extremism that seeks to justify violence in any way, it is very important that we do not back these people, and we do not appear on platforms with them. And I have to say, I am concerned about Labour’s candidate for Mayor of London, who has appeared again and again and again . . . The Honourable Member for Tooting has appeared on a platform with him [imam Suliman Gani] nine times. This man supports IS.”

David Cameron, 30 May 2016

“Let me first of all congratulate Sadiq on his victory. He talked about his father. He’s the son of a bus driver. I’m the son of a stockbroker, which is not quite so romantic. But he makes an important point about our country. In one generation someone who’s a proud Muslim, a proud Brit and a proud Londoner can become mayor of the greatest city on Earth. That says something about our country. There are still glass ceilings we have got to smash. There’s still discrimination we have got to fight.”

What a difference a month makes, eh?

I'm a mole, innit.