"Through the Cervix of Hawwah": don't judge a song by its title

The oddly-named metal records you must listen to.

I've recently been bitten by a metal bug; it's pretty ferocious and yet seemingly not very popular and not all that contagious. Listening to hardcore, metal or drone records brings with it the fairly unique problem that the artists often have such silly names, outfits and ideas that it can distract one hugely from the noise that is actually being made. The song names tend to be so spectacular that it is almost impossible for the music to compete; Bonedust on Dead Genitals for example.

There is a lot of very good stuff around at the moment though and whether attracted, appalled or indifferent to the whole language that comes with the genre, it would be a pity if you were to miss out on it all. Prison Sweat by Total Abuse is a current fav, along with Dead in the Dirt's album Fear. Philly group Satanzied also have new material in the form of Technical Virginity. Despite having a rather pretty sleeve depicting a pyramid with a white picket fence, Satanzied seem to intersperse their music with a sound similar to vomiting (it works though.) Finally, Antediluvian's soon to be released Through the Cervix of Hawwah, which may have developed a metal form of Tuvan throat singing to accompany their breed of onslaught, and I really like Tuvan throat singing. There really is something here for everyone: get bitten.

"Hogg" from the Total Abuse album Prison Sweat:

 

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Harry Potter Week

Celebrating 20 years of Harry Potter.

Do you know what day it is? Today is Monday 26 June 2017 – which means it’s 20 years since Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone was first published in the UK. That’s two decades of knowing and loving Harry Potter.

Here at the New Statesman, a solid 90 per cent of the online staff live and breathe Harry Potter. So we thought now would be the perfect time to run a week of Potter-themed articles. We’ve got a mix of personal reflections, very (very) geeky analysis, cultural criticism, nostalgia, and some truly bizarre fan fiction. You have been warned. 

See below for the full list, which will be updated throughout the week:

Jonn Elledge and the Young Hagrid Audition

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.

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