Music to bathe in

Tom Ravenscroft opts for comfort over clever where indie's concerned and discovers he's an underwate

I like Swiftumz -- not just because they sound like they might be one of those tasty children's cold remedies that used to make you pine for sickness when you were little but because they are a slightly rubbish indie rock band that I derive a strange comfort from. I like it when bands sound like they haven't been playing together for very long and don't necessarily retain any musical talent but manage to slog out a few good tunes through sheer desire. Swiftumz give off that impression; everything slightly out of tune, time and practice. I suspect this may be a well-organised and intentional sound but I'm happy to believe it is not: I'm getting a bit bored of listening to clever and hope this isn't. Their album is called Don't Trip and is out in August.

I was told this week that I was a fan of underwater sounds. I wasn't aware if this and I'm not sure if it's something I need worry about. Then, right on cue, Dam Mantle's new EP We arrives in my life and perfectly fits this accusation; it is music that sounds like it's been put through a tap. It is warm, pretty and sleepy sounding. You should take a bath in it.

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Nineties boyband 5ive pull out of pro-Brexit concert, after learning it was “political”

“As a band, Five have no political allegiances.”

I woke up today with this feeling that better things are coming my way. One of those better things was Leave.EU’s BPop Live, the bizarre pro-Brexit concert at the NEC arena in Birmingham. With a line-up including Nineties stars 5ive, Alesha Dixon and East 17, as well as speeches from Nigel Farage, Dr Liam Fox and Kate Hoey, it was sure to be deliciously awkward fun.

But those halcyon days were over as soon as they began. Reports are now circling that the two original members of 5ive who had signed up to the gig, Ritchie Neville and Scott Robinson, have cancelled their appearance after realising that this was, in fact, a political concert.

A spokesperson told the Mirror:

When Rich and Scott agreed to play the event they understood that it was a pop concert funded by one of the Brexit organisations and not a political rally.

Ah, one of those non-political Brexit-funded concerts, then.

As it has come to light that this is more a political rally with entertainment included they have both decided to cancel their involvement. They would like to make it clear that as a band Five have no political allegiances or opinions for either side.

5ive have no political allegiance. They are lone wolves, making their way in this world with nothing but a thirst for vigilante justice. 5ive are the resident president, the 5th element. They know no allegiances. (Also, it’s 5ive with a 5, I will have it no other way.)

Their allegiance is first and foremost to their fans.

Ok, I’m tearing up now. I pledge allegiance to the band

A divide between two members of the Nineties’ best-loved boybands is terrifying to imagine. They must have felt like they should have been screaming, trying to get through to their friends. Sometimes, it feels that life has no meaning, but, if I know 5ive, things will be alright in the end. For who else can truly get on up, when they’re down?

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.