Assad's private emails show a leader in denial

On the anniversary of the Syrian uprising, private emails of Bashar al-Assad and his wife Asma are p

On the first anniversary of the Syrian uprising, which has so far claimed the lives of 8,000 people, the Guardian has obtained a raft of emails from private accounts belonging to President Bashar al-Assad and his wife Asma.

As Assad refused to stand down and the death toll grew from his brutal repression of protesters, the emails show the first family continuing to live in luxury. Emails show Asma Assad spending thousands of dollars ordering expensive goods on the internet -- including £10,000 on tables, chandeliers, and candlesticks from Paris -- while Assad uses a third party with a US email address to sidestep US sanctions against him and buy music and apps from Apple's iTunes.

The emails, accessed by anti-regime activists after someone believed to be in the president's inner circle passed them the usernames and passwords, give an insight into Assad's mindset and his coterie of advisers.

He appears to remain light-hearted, despite the bloodshed. If there was any doubt that promises of reform were not genuinely meant, it can be put to rest. In one email, he describes these reforms as "rubbish laws of parties, elections, media". Later, he emails an aide with a YouTube clip re-enacting the siege of Homs using toys and biscuits.

There is also reference to advice from Iran and Lebanon's Hezbollah. Both countries are suspected by international bodies of providing on the ground assistance to the regime, but have insisted their support is only moral.

Elsewhere, Asma's regular correspondence with Mayassa al-Thani, the Qatar emir's daughter, chills after Thani suggests that Assad should step down and offers the couple exile in Doha.

However, although the couple appear to be living in denial, continuing their comfortable lifestyle, there are points where the strain shows. On 28 December, Asma Assad is said to have emailed her husband to say: "If we are strong together, we will overcome this together ... I love you."

The Guardian has said that it cannot verify the emails beyond all doubt, but their checks indicate that they are not forgeries. You can read a selection of the emails here.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Can Philip Hammond save the Conservatives from public anger at their DUP deal?

The Chancellor has the wriggle room to get close to the DUP's spending increase – but emotion matters more than facts in politics.

The magic money tree exists, and it is growing in Northern Ireland. That’s the attack line that Labour will throw at Theresa May in the wake of her £1bn deal with the DUP to keep her party in office.

It’s worth noting that while £1bn is a big deal in terms of Northern Ireland’s budget – just a touch under £10bn in 2016/17 – as far as the total expenditure of the British government goes, it’s peanuts.

The British government spent £778bn last year – we’re talking about spending an amount of money in Northern Ireland over the course of two years that the NHS loses in pen theft over the course of one in England. To match the increase in relative terms, you’d be looking at a £35bn increase in spending.

But, of course, political arguments are about gut instinct rather than actual numbers. The perception that the streets of Antrim are being paved by gold while the public realm in England, Scotland and Wales falls into disrepair is a real danger to the Conservatives.

But the good news for them is that last year Philip Hammond tweaked his targets to give himself greater headroom in case of a Brexit shock. Now the Tories have experienced a shock of a different kind – a Corbyn shock. That shock was partly due to the Labour leader’s good campaign and May’s bad campaign, but it was also powered by anger at cuts to schools and anger among NHS workers at Jeremy Hunt’s stewardship of the NHS. Conservative MPs have already made it clear to May that the party must not go to the country again while defending cuts to school spending.

Hammond can get to slightly under that £35bn and still stick to his targets. That will mean that the DUP still get to rave about their higher-than-average increase, while avoiding another election in which cuts to schools are front-and-centre. But whether that deprives Labour of their “cuts for you, but not for them” attack line is another question entirely. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.

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