Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The PM will forever be saddled with Raisa (Telegraph)

Stories of horse-riding with Rebekah Brooks in Chipping Norton embed a deadly image of Cameron as part of a swaggering lofty elite, writes Matthew Norman.

2. We need a welfare state that secures Beveridges legacy (FT)

James Purnell, former Labour Work and Pensions Secretary, calls for rebalancing welfare provision in lean times with an emphasis on quality childcare.

3. Silence in the court (Guardian)

Leading article attacks government proposals to hold certain trials covering 'sensitive material' in secret.

4. Knives out for Boris (Daily Mail)

Sonia Purnell, biographer of Boris Johnson, catalogues some of the reasons why his campaign for re-election is proving tricky and why senior Tories are determined to thwart any other ambitions he might have.

5. Labour must bite the welfare bullet to catch the public mood (Independent)

The economics of welfare reform aren't working out so well for the government, but the politics are, says Andrew Grice.

6. Maybe they are scroungers, just don't say so (Times)

The Tories' are right to be instinctively hard-hearted towards people on benefits (and the generally destitute), but to be elected they have to pretend otherwise, Matthew Parris argues.

7. From Google Downwards our Digital masters must be watched (Guardian)

Westminster's power pales beside the titanic reach of the new online leviathans, writes Jonathan Freedland.

8. Our era needs to rediscover economic statesmanship (FT)

America is reneging on its historic obligations to help the world sort itself out in a time of crisis, writes Financial Times Editor Lionel Barber.

9. As recession bites is a new kind of Northern politics emerging? (Guardian)

Ian Jack hunts for a Socialist revival in Huddersfield.

10. Admit it, the NHS is a rotten way of doing things (Telegraph)

The nation thinks it loves the health service, but it is deluded. In fact, the NHS is a vast, selfish bureaucracy, writes Charles Moore.

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Amber Rudd's ignorance isn't just a problem for the laws she writes

Politicians' lack of understanding leads to the wrong laws - and leaves real problems unchecked. 

Amber Rudd’s interview with Andrew Marr yesterday is not going to feature in her highlights reel, that is for certain. Her headline-grabbing howler was her suggesting was that to fight terror “the best people…who understand the necessary hashtags” would stop extremist material “ever being put up, not just taken down”, but the entire performance was riddled with poorly-briefed errors.

During one particularly mystifying exchange, Rudd claimed that she wasn’t asking for permission to “go into the Cloud”, when she is, in fact, asking for permission to go into the Cloud.

That lack of understanding makes itself felt in the misguided attempt to force tech companies to install a backdoor in encrypted communications. I outline some of the problems with that approach here, and Paul Goodman puts it well over at ConservativeHome, the problem with creating a backdoor is that “the security services would indeed be able to travel down it.  So, however, might others – the agencies serving the Chinese and Russian governments, for example, not to mention non-state hackers and criminals”.

But it’s not just in what the government does that makes ministers’ lack of understanding of tech issues a problem. As I’ve written before, there is a problem where hate speech is allowed to flourish freely on new media platforms. After-the-fact enforcement means that jihadist terrorism and white supremacist content can attract a large audience on YouTube and Facebook before it is taken down, while Twitter is notoriously sluggish about removing abuse and hosts a large number of extremists on its site. At time of writing, David Duke, the former head of the Ku Klux Klan, has free use of YouTube to post videos with titles such as “CNN interview on Bannon exposes Jewish bias”, “Will the white race survive?” and “Stop the genocide of European mankind”. It’s somewhat odd, to put it mildly, that WhatsApp is facing more heat for a service that is enjoyed by and protects millions of honest consumers while new media is allowed to be intensely relaxed about hosting hate speech.

Outside of the field of anti-terror, technological illiteracy means that old-fashioned exploitation becomes innovative “disruption” provided it is facilitated by an app. Government and opposition politicians simultaneously decry old businesses’ use of zero-hours contracts and abuse of self-employment status to secure the benefits of a full-time employee without having to bear the costs, while hailing and facilitating the same behaviour provided the company in question was founded after 2007.

As funny as Rudd’s ill-briefed turn on the BBC was, the consequences are anything but funny. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.