Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The PM will forever be saddled with Raisa (Telegraph)

Stories of horse-riding with Rebekah Brooks in Chipping Norton embed a deadly image of Cameron as part of a swaggering lofty elite, writes Matthew Norman.

2. We need a welfare state that secures Beveridges legacy (FT)

James Purnell, former Labour Work and Pensions Secretary, calls for rebalancing welfare provision in lean times with an emphasis on quality childcare.

3. Silence in the court (Guardian)

Leading article attacks government proposals to hold certain trials covering 'sensitive material' in secret.

4. Knives out for Boris (Daily Mail)

Sonia Purnell, biographer of Boris Johnson, catalogues some of the reasons why his campaign for re-election is proving tricky and why senior Tories are determined to thwart any other ambitions he might have.

5. Labour must bite the welfare bullet to catch the public mood (Independent)

The economics of welfare reform aren't working out so well for the government, but the politics are, says Andrew Grice.

6. Maybe they are scroungers, just don't say so (Times)

The Tories' are right to be instinctively hard-hearted towards people on benefits (and the generally destitute), but to be elected they have to pretend otherwise, Matthew Parris argues.

7. From Google Downwards our Digital masters must be watched (Guardian)

Westminster's power pales beside the titanic reach of the new online leviathans, writes Jonathan Freedland.

8. Our era needs to rediscover economic statesmanship (FT)

America is reneging on its historic obligations to help the world sort itself out in a time of crisis, writes Financial Times Editor Lionel Barber.

9. As recession bites is a new kind of Northern politics emerging? (Guardian)

Ian Jack hunts for a Socialist revival in Huddersfield.

10. Admit it, the NHS is a rotten way of doing things (Telegraph)

The nation thinks it loves the health service, but it is deluded. In fact, the NHS is a vast, selfish bureaucracy, writes Charles Moore.

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Will Jeremy Corbyn stand down if Labour loses the general election?

Defeat at the polls might not be the end of Corbyn’s leadership.

The latest polls suggest that Labour is headed for heavy defeat in the June general election. Usually a general election loss would be the trigger for a leader to quit: Michael Foot, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband all stood down after their first defeat, although Neil Kinnock saw out two losses before resigning in 1992.

It’s possible, if unlikely, that Corbyn could become prime minister. If that prospect doesn’t materialise, however, the question is: will Corbyn follow the majority of his predecessors and resign, or will he hang on in office?

Will Corbyn stand down? The rules

There is no formal process for the parliamentary Labour party to oust its leader, as it discovered in the 2016 leadership challenge. Even after a majority of his MPs had voted no confidence in him, Corbyn stayed on, ultimately winning his second leadership contest after it was decided that the current leader should be automatically included on the ballot.

This year’s conference will vote on to reform the leadership selection process that would make it easier for a left-wing candidate to get on the ballot (nicknamed the “McDonnell amendment” by centrists): Corbyn could be waiting for this motion to pass before he resigns.

Will Corbyn stand down? The membership

Corbyn’s support in the membership is still strong. Without an equally compelling candidate to put before the party, Corbyn’s opponents in the PLP are unlikely to initiate another leadership battle they’re likely to lose.

That said, a general election loss could change that. Polling from March suggests that half of Labour members wanted Corbyn to stand down either immediately or before the general election.

Will Corbyn stand down? The rumours

Sources close to Corbyn have said that he might not stand down, even if he leads Labour to a crushing defeat this June. They mention Kinnock’s survival after the 1987 general election as a precedent (although at the 1987 election, Labour did gain seats).

Will Corbyn stand down? The verdict

Given his struggles to manage his own MPs and the example of other leaders, it would be remarkable if Corbyn did not stand down should Labour lose the general election. However, staying on after a vote of no-confidence in 2016 was also remarkable, and the mooted changes to the leadership election process give him a reason to hold on until September in order to secure a left-wing succession.

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