Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Care of the elderly: it's not too late to make Britain a good place in which to grow old (Guardian)

At this time of year as families gather, our thoughts turn to the nation's elderly and how to provide for them fairly, writes Will Hutton.

2. What does 2013 hold for the main party leaders? (Guardian)

Nick Clegg and David Cameron face more of the same. Ed Miliband's future is more complicated. He has choices, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

3. Honours list: happy for Sir Wiggo, but Danny Boyle has a point (Guardian)

Danny Boyle's rejection of a knighthood reminds us that the principle behind the list is flawed, writes Stephanie Merritt.

4. Angry? Me? How dare you! (Guardian)

Nowadays, outrage is our only mode of discourse. It is high time that we all calmed down, writes Viv Groskop.

5. Ditching their modernisation campaign was the Tories’ worst strategic error since the poll tax (Telegraph) David Cameron must address the identity crisis in his party before it is too late, writes Matthew d'Aconda.

6. It's two years away, but the 2015 election is already lost (Telegraph)

Four factors conspire to make a Tory majority an outright impossibility, writes Paul Goodman.

7. Europe, wind, warming... we're slowly waking up to reality (Telegraph)

It was the year when many long-dominant belief systems began to collapse, writes Christopher Booker.

8. 2012: A year I won't forget, for all the wrong reasons (Independent)

I can't remember when I've ended a year so angry. Goodbye 2012 and good riddance, writes Joan Smith

9. Children face cruelties of the adult world (Financial Times)

Innocence has been squandered by mindless violence and economic idiocy, writes Simon Schama.

10. Cliffhanger (Times)

America may yet step back from the brink — but its bungled handling of its fiscal crisis reflects a broader malaise that could affect us all, writes Tony Allen-Mills.

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Brexit campaign publishes private phone numbers of Eurosceptic rivals

Leave.EU hate the EU and hate Vote Leave who also hate the EU. What could go wrong?

Remember Leave.EU? Not to be confused with Vote Leave, which is the pro-Brexit group led by one of the former mayors with Hitler tourettes, or with Grassroots Out, which was the group with the neon green ties, or with UKIP. Even though Grassroots Out, UKIP and Leave.EU are all funded by Arron Banks, a multi-millionaire with interests in the British Virgin Islands who lives in a mansion once owned by the prog rock musician Mike Oldfield. Glad that’s all clear.

Anyway, Leave.EU still exists, even after Vote Leave was designated as the official Leave campaign – spending more of its time attacking the conduct, tactics and key figures of Vote Leave rather than, you know, that big EU thing they’re supposed to hate so much.

One of their main sources of frustration is Vote Leave’s refusal to have UKIP leader Nigel Farage as its representative in any of the EU debates. So, obviously, rather than pressing their case through normal channels, Leave.EU did what any respectable organisation would, and emailed the private phone numbers of senior figures at the BBC and Vote Leave out to its entire mailing list.

Which, needless to say, upset those people. Douglas Carswell sent a message asking for his number to be removed, so of course Leave.EU published that too.

No wonder the Brexiters are so opposed to international cooperation when they can’t even keep the peace on their own side. 

I'm a mole, innit.