Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Care of the elderly: it's not too late to make Britain a good place in which to grow old (Guardian)

At this time of year as families gather, our thoughts turn to the nation's elderly and how to provide for them fairly, writes Will Hutton.

2. What does 2013 hold for the main party leaders? (Guardian)

Nick Clegg and David Cameron face more of the same. Ed Miliband's future is more complicated. He has choices, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

3. Honours list: happy for Sir Wiggo, but Danny Boyle has a point (Guardian)

Danny Boyle's rejection of a knighthood reminds us that the principle behind the list is flawed, writes Stephanie Merritt.

4. Angry? Me? How dare you! (Guardian)

Nowadays, outrage is our only mode of discourse. It is high time that we all calmed down, writes Viv Groskop.

5. Ditching their modernisation campaign was the Tories’ worst strategic error since the poll tax (Telegraph) David Cameron must address the identity crisis in his party before it is too late, writes Matthew d'Aconda.

6. It's two years away, but the 2015 election is already lost (Telegraph)

Four factors conspire to make a Tory majority an outright impossibility, writes Paul Goodman.

7. Europe, wind, warming... we're slowly waking up to reality (Telegraph)

It was the year when many long-dominant belief systems began to collapse, writes Christopher Booker.

8. 2012: A year I won't forget, for all the wrong reasons (Independent)

I can't remember when I've ended a year so angry. Goodbye 2012 and good riddance, writes Joan Smith

9. Children face cruelties of the adult world (Financial Times)

Innocence has been squandered by mindless violence and economic idiocy, writes Simon Schama.

10. Cliffhanger (Times)

America may yet step back from the brink — but its bungled handling of its fiscal crisis reflects a broader malaise that could affect us all, writes Tony Allen-Mills.

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To stop Jeremy Corbyn, I am giving my second preference to Andy Burnham

The big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Voting is now underway in the Labour leadership election. There can be no doubt that Jeremy Corbyn is the frontrunner, but the race isn't over yet.

I know from conversations across the country that many voters still haven't made up their mind.

Some are drawn to Jeremy's promises of a new Jerusalem and endless spending, but worried that these endless promises, with no credibility, will only serve to lose us the next general election.

Others are certain that a Jeremy victory is really a win for Cameron and Osborne, but don't know who is the best alternative to vote for.

I am supporting Liz Kendall and will give her my first preference. But polling data is brutally clear: the big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Andy can win. He can draw together support from across the party, motivated by his history of loyalty to the Labour movement, his passionate appeal for unity in fighting the Tories, and the findings of every poll of the general public in this campaign that he is best placed candidate to win the next general election.

Yvette, in contrast, would lose to Jeremy Corbyn and lose heavily. Evidence from data collected by all the campaigns – except (apparently) Yvette's own – shows this. All publicly available polling shows the same. If Andy drops out of the race, a large part of the broad coalition he attracts will vote for Jeremy. If Yvette is knocked out, her support firmly swings behind Andy.

We will all have our views about the different candidates, but the real choice for our country is between a Labour government and the ongoing rightwing agenda of the Tories.

I am in politics to make a real difference to the lives of my constituents. We are all in the Labour movement to get behind the beliefs that unite all in our party.

In the crucial choice we are making right now, I have no doubt that a vote for Jeremy would be the wrong choice – throwing away the next election, and with it hope for the next decade.

A vote for Yvette gets the same result – her defeat by Jeremy, and Jeremy's defeat to Cameron and Osborne.

In the crucial choice between Yvette and Andy, Andy will get my second preference so we can have the best hope of keeping the fight for our party alive, and the best hope for the future of our country too.

Tom Blenkinsop is the Labour MP for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland