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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Is Rupert Murdoch a fit and proper person to run a company? (Daily Telegraph)

The boss must take final responsibility for the culture of criminality at News International, says Peter Oborne.

2. Egypt a year on: This is not the Tahrir dream, but there's much to be won (Guardian)

The country is torn between an entrenched security state, politically savvy Islamists and anxious revolutionaries, writes Timothy Garton Ash.

3. This postgraduate brain drain needs plugging (Times) (£)

All the fuss about fees has obscured the bigger issue of unfunded research students, says Andrew Hamilton.

4. The regime calls it 'cleaning', but the dirty truth is plain to see (Independent)

The word being used by Syria is a chilling one, says Robert Fisk.

5. Why does this coalition wobble like a jelly at every whinge and wail from the left? (Daily Mail)

The Cameroons, moistly tolerant, are being comprehensively outmanoeuvred, writes Quentin Letts.

6. On capitalism we lefties are clueless - it's not just a rightwing caricature (Guardian)

Emma Harrison and her ilk are free to reap the benefits of our shame at being smart with money and investment, writes Zoe Williams.

7. London must scare insider traders (Financial Times)

The UK should reconsider use of phone-tap evidence, argues John Gapper.

8. You might expect it from North Korea. Not Britain (Daily Mail)

It is not in the public interest to allow clumsy cover-ups in the name of "national security", says David Davis. That is why secret courts must be rejected.

9. The prime minister needs to think long (Financial Times)

The governing habits of the coalition need to change, writes Gavin Kelly.

10. Please end this disgrace, Mr Pickles (Independent)

Instead of more confrontation it is time for a mediated settlement on Traveller sites, says Thomas Hammarberg.

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