Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Margaret Thatcher's biggest debt was to Argentina's navy (Guardian)

If not for Alfredo Astiz, 30 years ago Britain would have lost the Falkland Islands and Thatcher her political career, says Simon Jenkins.

2. Those hard Tory heads and hearts are back (Times) (£)

Not only is the 50p tax cut indefensible, but the Chancellor's cuts are grossly unfair in their effect on the poor, argues Philip Collins.

3. France is a deeply racist country, and Toulouse will only make that worse (Independent)

The French have transferred their resentments from Jews to Arabs, says Adrian Hamilton.

4. Chancellors cross the elderly at their peril (Daily Mail)

Osborne is blithely ignorant of the pain the elderly have suffered in the past few years, says a Daily Mail editorial.

5. Osborne gets bolder with each Budget - but it's still not enough (Daily Telegraph)

The Chancellor's slow-motion cuts are dragging out the austerity process, says Fraser Nelson.

6. A budget for Tory blowhards and Redwood dreamers (Guardian)

Forget mugging grannies, George Osborne's 50p rate gamble reveals a naked yearning for the glory days of Thatcher, writes Polly Toynbee.

7. Osborne's 'granny tax' does not go far enough (Financial Times)

Pensioners have had an easy recession so far, writes Tim Leunig.

8. Hague could learn from Operation Babylon (Daily Telegraph)

Israel's 1981 bombing raid on Iraq's nuclear reactor has echoes for the Middle East today, says Azriel Bermant.

9. Obama gets the conservative vote (Financial Times)

The Republicans are trailing in places where they have traditionally had a strong edge - both home and abroad, writes Philip Stephens

10. The British high street is dead - let's celebrate (Guardian)

Most town centres are boring clones, and the closure of large retailers will open up creative space for quirky start-ups, writes Wayne Hemingway.

Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.