Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Margaret Thatcher's biggest debt was to Argentina's navy (Guardian)

If not for Alfredo Astiz, 30 years ago Britain would have lost the Falkland Islands and Thatcher her political career, says Simon Jenkins.

2. Those hard Tory heads and hearts are back (Times) (£)

Not only is the 50p tax cut indefensible, but the Chancellor's cuts are grossly unfair in their effect on the poor, argues Philip Collins.

3. France is a deeply racist country, and Toulouse will only make that worse (Independent)

The French have transferred their resentments from Jews to Arabs, says Adrian Hamilton.

4. Chancellors cross the elderly at their peril (Daily Mail)

Osborne is blithely ignorant of the pain the elderly have suffered in the past few years, says a Daily Mail editorial.

5. Osborne gets bolder with each Budget - but it's still not enough (Daily Telegraph)

The Chancellor's slow-motion cuts are dragging out the austerity process, says Fraser Nelson.

6. A budget for Tory blowhards and Redwood dreamers (Guardian)

Forget mugging grannies, George Osborne's 50p rate gamble reveals a naked yearning for the glory days of Thatcher, writes Polly Toynbee.

7. Osborne's 'granny tax' does not go far enough (Financial Times)

Pensioners have had an easy recession so far, writes Tim Leunig.

8. Hague could learn from Operation Babylon (Daily Telegraph)

Israel's 1981 bombing raid on Iraq's nuclear reactor has echoes for the Middle East today, says Azriel Bermant.

9. Obama gets the conservative vote (Financial Times)

The Republicans are trailing in places where they have traditionally had a strong edge - both home and abroad, writes Philip Stephens

10. The British high street is dead - let's celebrate (Guardian)

Most town centres are boring clones, and the closure of large retailers will open up creative space for quirky start-ups, writes Wayne Hemingway.

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To stop Jeremy Corbyn, I am giving my second preference to Andy Burnham

The big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Voting is now underway in the Labour leadership election. There can be no doubt that Jeremy Corbyn is the frontrunner, but the race isn't over yet.

I know from conversations across the country that many voters still haven't made up their mind.

Some are drawn to Jeremy's promises of a new Jerusalem and endless spending, but worried that these endless promises, with no credibility, will only serve to lose us the next general election.

Others are certain that a Jeremy victory is really a win for Cameron and Osborne, but don't know who is the best alternative to vote for.

I am supporting Liz Kendall and will give her my first preference. But polling data is brutally clear: the big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Andy can win. He can draw together support from across the party, motivated by his history of loyalty to the Labour movement, his passionate appeal for unity in fighting the Tories, and the findings of every poll of the general public in this campaign that he is best placed candidate to win the next general election.

Yvette, in contrast, would lose to Jeremy Corbyn and lose heavily. Evidence from data collected by all the campaigns – except (apparently) Yvette's own – shows this. All publicly available polling shows the same. If Andy drops out of the race, a large part of the broad coalition he attracts will vote for Jeremy. If Yvette is knocked out, her support firmly swings behind Andy.

We will all have our views about the different candidates, but the real choice for our country is between a Labour government and the ongoing rightwing agenda of the Tories.

I am in politics to make a real difference to the lives of my constituents. We are all in the Labour movement to get behind the beliefs that unite all in our party.

In the crucial choice we are making right now, I have no doubt that a vote for Jeremy would be the wrong choice – throwing away the next election, and with it hope for the next decade.

A vote for Yvette gets the same result – her defeat by Jeremy, and Jeremy's defeat to Cameron and Osborne.

In the crucial choice between Yvette and Andy, Andy will get my second preference so we can have the best hope of keeping the fight for our party alive, and the best hope for the future of our country too.

Tom Blenkinsop is the Labour MP for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland