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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Sorry, Shirley Williams, but I have to nail your health bill myths (Guardian)

The evidence suggests that if anyone is guilty of trumping truth with tribalism on privatisation and the NHS, it's Williams, says Polly Toynbee.

2. Gordon Brown is nowhere, yet everywhere (Independent)

Without acknowledgement from either side, it is Brown's rulebook that persists, writes Steve Richards.

3. It's unavoidable: we must talk to the Taleban (Times) (£)

The Kandahar tragedy makes it urgent to have all parties at the table - except al-Qaeda, says David Miliband.

4. Irrelevant tax debate shows the sorry state of the coalition (Financial Times)

The toing-and-froing over the top rate has been displacement activity, says Philip Stephens.

5. Neither side is winning, no end is in sight (Independent)

An authoritarian regime can always commandeer what it needs, writes Patrick Cockburn.

6. Labour is losing the economic battle, so it's turning to crime (Daily Telegraph)

No one's listening to the two Eds, writes Mary Riddell. But could law and order policy give them a new audience?

7. United States and Great Britain: an essential relationship (Guardian)

The alliance between our countries is a partnership of the heart - we count on each other and the world counts on that alliance, write Barack Obama and David Cameron.

8. The US labour market is still a shambles (Financial Times)

Little has been done about the underlying structural problems, writes Joseph Stiglitz.

9. Labour's lost liberalism (Guardian)

Now that Blue Labour has come unstuck, the party should reconnect with its orange heritage, argue Patrick Diamond and Michael Kenny.

10. Every Brit should urge their French neighbours to vote to end illegal immigration (Daily Mail)

We should welcome Sarkozy's call to revise the open borders of the EU, argues Janice Atkinson-Small.