Chart of the day: gay marriage

Where do the public stand on Cameron's plan to introduce same-sex marriage?

One of the concerns expressed by some Conservatives over David Cameron's plan to introduce gay marriage is that the measure lacks public support. The most recent YouGov poll, however, found that a plurality, if not a majority, of voters support the proposal. In total, forty three per cent of voters support same sex marriage, compared with 32 per cent who oppose gay marriage but support civil partnerships, and 15 per cent who oppose both.

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Graphic by Henrik Pettersson.

But worryingly for Cameron, while 51 per cent of Labour voters and 53 per cent of Lib Dems support same sex marriage, just 30 per cent of Conservatives do. Worse, only 21 per cent think that the PM favours gay marriage because he "genuinely believes that it is the right thing do". The majority of voters (63 per cent) agree that he "does not believe it is right, but is doing it for political reasons".

Thus, despite the absence of any evidence to support this view (Cameron, once a supporter of Section 28, underwent a clear conversion to gay rights), most voters believe that the PM is acting out of cynical motives. As YouGov's Peter Kellner writes, "This is bad news, not only for Mr Cameron, and indeed not only for the Conservatives, but for the reputation of our political system."

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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RMT poised to rejoin the Labour Party

The transport union is set to vote on reaffiliation to the party, with RMT leaders backing the move.

Plans are being drawn up for the RMT (the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers) to reaffiliate to the Labour Party in the wake of Jeremy Corbyn’s significant gains in the general election, the New Statesman has learnt.

The union, which represents tube drivers and other workers across the transport sector, was expelled from the Labour Party under Tony Blair after some Scottish branches voted to support the Scottish Socialist Party instead.

But the RMT endorsed both of Corbyn’s bids for the Labour leadership and its ruling national executive committee backed a Labour vote on 8 June.

Corbyn addressed the RMT’s annual general meeting in Exeter yesterday, where he was “given a hero’s welcome”, in the words of one delegate. Mick Cash, the RMT’s general secretary, praised Corbyn as the union’s “long-term friend and comrade”.

After the meeting, Steve Hedley, assistant general secretary at the RMT, posted a picture to Facebook with John McDonnell. The caption read: “With the shadow chancellor John McDonnell arguing that we should affiliate to the Labour Party after consulting fully and democratically with our members”.

The return of the RMT to Labour would be welcomed by the party leadership with open arms. And although its comparably small size would mean that the RMT would have little effect on the internal workings of Labour Party conference or its ruling NEC, its wide spread across the country could make the union a power player in the life of local Labour parties.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.

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