Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's newspapers.

1. Intervention in Syria will escalate, not stop the killing (Guardian)

Russia and China blocked a bid to force regime change. But, says Seumas Milne, a negotiated settlement is the only way out of civil war.

2. How do we help get rid of President Bashar al-Assad? (Daily Telegraph)

Alex Spillius explains that unlike the former rebels in Libya, those in Syria are fragmented and don't control even a corner of the country.

3. Putin's fears are not for Assad but for himself (Times) (£)

Tony Brenton says that Russia's support for Syria is a diplomatic error forced by the rising tide of protest at home.

4. Don't let vested interests skew the NHS debate (Independent)

Doctors can, of course, have fair concerns; but they must be understood in context, says this leading article.

5. Deport Abu Qatada: or if not, give him the law's full protection (Guardian)

Qatada champions al-Qaida and delights in terrorist outrages. But Britain is robust enough to tolerate madcap clerics, says Simon Jenkins.

6. There's only half an answer to high pay: growth (Times) (£)

Nobody shouted about bonuses during the boom, says Daniel Finkelstein. Don't scare off private business and risk delaying recovery.

7. Crisis must not change India's course (Financial Times)

Eurozone and oil-price threats should not be exaggerated, warns Martin Wolf.

8. Why India needs aid (Guardian)

Most of its population are still poor. The row over British aid shows how many people confuse rapid growth with wealth, says Praful Bidwai.

9. Greece is being screwed down so Sarkozy can meet his deadline (Independent)

The motive and timing of Angela Merkel's support for the French president are interesting, says Hamish McRae.

10. The US feels sunny again while Britain shivers (Times) (£)

The two are conducting a controlled economic experiment, says Anatole Kaletsky. Now we can see the results.

Getty
Show Hide image

The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.