Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's newspapers.

1. Putin's veto sets Russia apart (Guardian)

Ignore Russia's public relations machine, says David Hearst: Putin has misread the turmoil in Syria as much as he has the protests at home.

2. It's time to support the opposition in the Syrian civil war (Financial Times)

Thanks to Russia and China, there is no guarantee Syria can avoid a bloody fate, write Malcolm Rifkind and Shashank Joshi.

3. Moral Blindness (Times) (£)

Russia and China acted for self-serving motives in vetoing the Security Council's condemnation of the bloodshed in Syria, says this leading article.

4. Oxford should refuse the Iron Lady this honour (Independent)

Baroness Thatcher's ideas should be freely taught, says Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, but a centre bearing her name would be a sign of undisputed greatness.

5. How Britain's migrants sewed the fabric of the nation (Guardian)

History shows it's hard to pick out which migrants will be good for the UK, says Robert Winder. It is risky for the state to try.

6. Britain won't create a Facebook until we learn to praise success (Daily Telegraph)

Unemployment is falling in the US, where wealth-creators are applauded, rather than denounced, writes Boris Johnson.

7. This 11-year exercise in self-delusion must end (Times) (£)

Our intervention in Afghanistan has been disastrous. Let's make the final months count, says Paddy Ashdown.

8. The how-to guide to toppling tyrants (Financial Times)

George B. N. Ayittey, an expert in the nature and flaws of tyranny, explains why undermining dictators is a science that requires time and thought.

9. What Whitehall could learn from Washington (Independent)

This leading article argues that ministers should introduce fresh blood into a service whose signal defect remains its institutional aversion to change.

10. The Iron Professor has one year to save Italy (Times) (£)

Mario Monti is trying to shock his country out of decline, says Bill Emmott -- but will he survive strikes and recession?

Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.