Chart of the day: nuclear weapons - who has what?

The number of nuclear warheads in Russia, the US and the rest.

While the "international community" is focused on ensuring Iran doesn't get its hands on a nuclear weapon, today's chart of the day looks at just how well-armed some of its members are.


Under the terms of the Non-Proliferation Treaty, there are officially only five "nuclear-weapon states" (China, France, Russia, the UK and the US) but four states that were not party to the treaty - India, Israel, Pakistan and North Korea - have since acquired nuclear weapons.

South Africa became the first country to voluntarily give up its nuclear weapons in 1989, followed by the former Soviet republics of Belarus, Kazakhstan and Ukraine, whose warheads were transferred to Russia in 1995-96.

Brazil, Argentina, Taiwan and South Korea all gave up secret nuclear weapons programmes.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.