Witney GP: "Nobody supports the NHS changes"

Senior GP in David Cameron's own constituency tells New Statesman "things are going to fail, hospita

In an exchange over the government's controversial health reforms at Prime Minister's Questions last Wednesday, David Cameron cited "a supportive GP . . . who hails from Doncaster [Ed Miliband's constituency]".

In this week's New Statesman (on newsstands tomorrow), Sophie Elmhirst travels to David Cameron's own Witney constituency in West Oxfordshire, where a senior partner of a local GP practice tells her:

"I would say very few GPs are happy with [the NHS reform] at all . . . Not a question of supporting it, it's a question of going along with it."

"In my practice, nobody supports the changes . . . people think there should be more clinical involvement in commissioning. But I don't think many people think that GPs are the right people to commission. They need input into it - but if we wanted to be managers we would have trained to be managers, not doctors. "

The GP adds:

"Most GPs are incredibly worried about conflict of interest. How can you be a patient's advocate and look after the money? A lot of people think the whole thing's designed to fail so they can bring private providers in. It's the one big bit of the economy that hasn't got private money in it."

Of the effects to patients from the health service overhaul, the Witney GP says:

"The public have just got no idea what's hitting them . . . Things are going to fail, hospitals will close, because the money's not going to be there. Things will get taken over. And if you're going to have to make a profit out of it, you're not going to have the same service."

In the same report, Elmhirst speaks to Dr Paul Roblin, the chief executive of Berkshire, Buckinghamshire & Oxfordshire Local Medical Council, which covers Cameron's Witney constituency. Speaking about the health and social care bill, currently working its way through the House of Lords, Roblin, a retired GP, says:

"It's a major change which is quite experimental at a time when the NHS is trying hard to save money. The timing doesn't seem to be good. Among GPs there's a huge spectrum of enthusiasm from those that think commissioning will work to those who think that think it's another fad in the NHS and will soon pass."

"There is a large bulk in middle just watching events, and waiting to see what happens. [They are] slightly perturbed - they didn't go into medicine to do that sort of thing [commissioning] and it's a distraction from actually seeing patients."

"Many GPs are fed up with continual NHS restructuring.... The actual job... takes a back seat for many years while the restructuring is taking place. It's a very wasteful process."

Roblin issues a personal message to the prime minister:

"Produce an environment where people within the NHS can concentrate on what really matters which is patient care rather than structural reorganisation. Because continual change is draining and wasteful. They describe it as modernisation. I think they should stop using that political euphemism."

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Sadiq Khan gives Jeremy Corbyn's supporters a lesson on power

The London mayor doused the Labour conference with cold electoral truths. 

There was just one message that Sadiq Khan wanted Labour to take from his conference speech: we need to be “in power”. The party’s most senior elected politician hammered this theme as relentlessly as his “son of a bus driver” line. His obsessive emphasis on “power” (used 38 times) showed how far he fears his party is from office and how misguided he believes Jeremy Corbyn’s supporters are.

Khan arrived on stage to a presidential-style video lauding his mayoral victory (a privilege normally reserved for the leader). But rather than delivering a self-congratulatory speech, he doused the conference with cold electoral truths. With the biggest personal mandate of any British politician in history, he was uniquely placed to do so.

“Labour is not in power in the place that we can have the biggest impact on our country: in parliament,” he lamented. It was a stern rebuke to those who regard the street, rather than the ballot box, as the principal vehicle of change.

Corbyn was mentioned just once, as Khan, who endorsed Owen Smith, acknowledged that “the leadership of our party has now been decided” (“I congratulate Jeremy on his clear victory”). But he was a ghostly presence for the rest of the speech, with Khan declaring “Labour out of power will never ever be good enough”. Though Corbyn joined the standing ovation at the end, he sat motionless during several of the applause lines.

If Khan’s “power” message was the stick, his policy programme was the carrot. Only in office, he said, could Labour tackle the housing crisis, air pollution, gender inequality and hate crime. He spoke hopefully of "winning the mayoral elections next year in Liverpool, Manchester and Birmingham", providing further models of campaigning success. 

Khan peroration was his most daring passage: “It’s time to put Labour back in power. It's time for a Labour government. A Labour Prime Minister in Downing Street. A Labour Cabinet. Labour values put into action.” The mayor has already stated that he does not believe Corbyn can fulfil this duty. The question left hanging was whether it would fall to Khan himself to answer the call. If, as he fears, Labour drifts ever further from power, his lustre will only grow.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.