The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Ban bonuses, and Fred Goodwin could have kept his knighthood (Guardian)

Even bankers want the bonus culture outlawed, says Simon Jenkins. It's a conspiracy to extract money from firms that properly belongs to others.

2. Don't penalise RBS just because we own it (Times) (£)

If its actions are targeted at individuals, not based on principle, the government will carry on blowing in the wind, warns Alistair Darling.

3. Occupy London's eviction is a failure for the church, not the camp (Guardian)

The protesters about to be removed from the steps of St Paul's could have helped the cathedral find a compelling new narrative, says Giles Fraser.

4. The Greeks will not be the last people to lose control of their fiscal policy (Independent)

Governments elected for four years must run fiscal policies sustainable for 40, writes Hamish McRae.

5. Our university revolution has only just begun (Daily Telegraph)

Students are now in the driving seat, but Britain is still at risk of being overtaken, says David Willetts.

6. David Cameron has allowed Europe to say FU to its people (Guardian)

The decision to let EU institutions police fiscal union is a massive missed opportunity for Cameron, and for Britain, argues Daniel Hannan.

7. Europe is stuck on life support (Financial Times)

The ECB has staved off a eurozone heart attack but its members face a long convalescence, writes Martin Wolf.

8. Reviving manufacturing is the key to our country's future prosperity (Daily Mirror)

Regulating and reforming banksters and hedge fund sharks is vital, writes Kevin Maguire. But a new industrial revolution is the way forward.

9. At long last, a fitting punishment for such arrogance (Daily Mail)

The removal of Fred Goodwin's knighthood will be a heavy blow to the man who led RBS into the abyss, says Stephen Glover.

10. The pound is a poison pill for an independent Scotland (Financial Times)

A currency union exists when people believe it does, says John Kay.