Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Why Labour chose Ed not David Miliband (Guardian)

David Miliband rejects my pro-state policy ideas as 'Reassurance Labour'. That's why he's not leader, writes Roy Hattersley.

2. David Miliband: the sniping and self-pity of a truly feeble man (Daily Telegraph)

The best thing that David Miliband could do for the Labour Party would be to shut up, says Matthew Norman.

3. Chris Huhne's downfall began the day he sacrificed his wife for his career (Daily Mail)

I still hope that my old friend is innocent, as he assured me he was, writes Stephen Glover.

4. Huhne's departure will sadden all who care about the environment (Independent)
His brilliant brain was never put to better use than when he saved the day at the Cancun talks, argues Michael McCarthy.

5. Huhne isn't hated. He just hasn't any friends (Times) (£)

Clegg will feel more comfortable without him, writes Matthew Parris. But the high priest of differentiation will not fade quietly away.

6. Chris Huhne, David Cameron and the RBS boss don't have it, but Al Gore did (Guardian)

From bonuses to knighthoods, the leaders we put in high office prefer jaw-jutting certainty to thoughtful judgment, argues Jonathan Freedland.

7. Fred Goodwin: a modern-day knight made to suffer a medieval punishment (Daily Telegraph)

Fred Goodwin should challenge the judgment of David Cameron's kangaroo court, says Charles Moore.

8. Our burn-a-banker frenzy is tempting - but wrong (Financial Times)

Gut reactions do not make good policy, writes Martin Dickson. We still need a banking industry.

9. Chris Huhne's resignation: the destructive result of love turned sour (Guardian)

Huhne made himself vulnerable to his enemies the minute he left his wife for his mistress, says Gaby Hinsliff. It's a curiously undignified way to go.

10. Lucky Dave's show goes on as an(other) irritant departs (Financial Times)

The Prime Minister is riding high in the polls in spite of deep economic gloom, says John Kampfner.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.