Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Tax England's green and pleasant land (Financial Times)

The case for a land tax is one of the oldest and least disputed propositions in economic thought, says Samuel Brittan.

2. If the Sun on Sunday soars Rupert Murdoch will also rise again (Guardian)

What was hailed as a victory for journalism is a sign that despite it all, News Corp's boss won't get his comeuppance in the UK, writes Polly Toynbee.

3. The private sector exposes fraud where the state only lets it fester (Daily Telegraph)

The left's campaign to keep profit out of public services must not be allowed to succeed, says Fraser Nelson.

4. How to free RBS from state ownership (Financial Times)

The government must accept that it may not recover all of its £45bn investment, write Paul Myners and Manus Costello.

5. Business must start a giving revolution (Independent)

Giving back to society is a no-brainer and should be an intrinsic part of today's capitalism, says Victor Blank.

6. Adele and her ilk have mangled the ancient art of rhetoric (Guardian)

Awards ceremonies highlight the amateurism of modern public speeches - most are an exercise in tedium and torture, says Simon Jenkins.

7. Firms will hire more workers if we make it easier to fire them (Daily Telegraph)

The US is showing Britain how to create jobs - everything else we've tried has failed to stimulate economic growth, writes Jeremy Warner.

8. If we can't intervene, at least we can isolate Syria (Independent)

There is no point in talking to a regime which has lost all credibility, argues Adrian Hamilton.

9. Rewarding failure at our expense... again (Daily Mail)

The Care Quality Commission has overlooked the most glaring examples of neglect, says a Daily Mail editorial.

10. The Malvinas/Falklands: diplomacy interrupted (Guardian)

Sending Prince William to the Malvinas, or Falkland Islands, sends a message of intimidation, argues Sean Penn.

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Appreciate the full horror of Nigel Farage's pro-Trump speech

The former Ukip leader has appeared at a Donald Trump rally. It went exactly as you would expect.

It is with a heavy heart that I must announce Nigel Farage is at it again.

The on-again, off-again Ukip leader and current Member of the European Parliament has appeared at a Donald Trump rally to lend his support to the presidential candidate.

It was, predictably, distressing.

Farage started by telling his American audience why they, like he, should be positive.

"I come to you from the United Kingdom"

Okay, good start. Undeniably true.

"– with a message of hope –

Again, probably quite true.

Image: Clearly hopeful (Wikipedia Screenshot)

– and optimism.”

Ah.

Image: Nigel Farage in front of a poster showing immigrants who are definitely not European (Getty)

He continues: “If the little people, if the real people–”

Wait, what?

Why is Trump nodding sagely at this?

The little people?

Image: It's a plane with the name Trump on it (Wikimedia Commons)

THE LITTLE PEOPLE?

Image: It's the word Trump on the side of a skyscraper I can't cope with this (Pixel)

THE ONLY LITTLE PERSON CLOSE TO TRUMP IS RIDING A MASSIVE STUFFED LION

Image: I don't even know what to tell you. It's Trump and his wife and a child riding a stuffed lion. 

IN A PENTHOUSE

A PENTHOUSE WHICH LOOKS LIKE LIBERACE WAS LET LOOSE WITH THE GILT ON DAY FIVE OF A PARTICULARLY BAD BENDER

Image: So much gold. Just gold, everywhere.

HIS WIFE HAS SO MANY BAGS SHE HAS TO EMPLOY A BAG MAN TO CARRY THEM

Image: I did not even know there were so many styles of Louis Vuitton, and my dentists has a lot of old copies of Vogue.

Anyway. Back to Farage, who is telling the little people that they can win "against the forces of global corporatism".

 

Image: Aaaaarggghhhh (Wikipedia Screenshot)

Ugh. Okay. What next? Oh god, he's telling them they can have a Brexit moment.

“... you can beat Washington...”

“... if enough decent people...”

“...are prepared to stand up against the establishment”

Image: A screenshot from Donald Trump's Wikipedia page.

I think I need a lie down.

Watch the full clip here:

Stephanie Boland is digital assistant at the New Statesman. She tweets at @stephanieboland