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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Tax England's green and pleasant land (Financial Times)

The case for a land tax is one of the oldest and least disputed propositions in economic thought, says Samuel Brittan.

2. If the Sun on Sunday soars Rupert Murdoch will also rise again (Guardian)

What was hailed as a victory for journalism is a sign that despite it all, News Corp's boss won't get his comeuppance in the UK, writes Polly Toynbee.

3. The private sector exposes fraud where the state only lets it fester (Daily Telegraph)

The left's campaign to keep profit out of public services must not be allowed to succeed, says Fraser Nelson.

4. How to free RBS from state ownership (Financial Times)

The government must accept that it may not recover all of its £45bn investment, write Paul Myners and Manus Costello.

5. Business must start a giving revolution (Independent)

Giving back to society is a no-brainer and should be an intrinsic part of today's capitalism, says Victor Blank.

6. Adele and her ilk have mangled the ancient art of rhetoric (Guardian)

Awards ceremonies highlight the amateurism of modern public speeches - most are an exercise in tedium and torture, says Simon Jenkins.

7. Firms will hire more workers if we make it easier to fire them (Daily Telegraph)

The US is showing Britain how to create jobs - everything else we've tried has failed to stimulate economic growth, writes Jeremy Warner.

8. If we can't intervene, at least we can isolate Syria (Independent)

There is no point in talking to a regime which has lost all credibility, argues Adrian Hamilton.

9. Rewarding failure at our expense... again (Daily Mail)

The Care Quality Commission has overlooked the most glaring examples of neglect, says a Daily Mail editorial.

10. The Malvinas/Falklands: diplomacy interrupted (Guardian)

Sending Prince William to the Malvinas, or Falkland Islands, sends a message of intimidation, argues Sean Penn.