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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The mood in Britain is to muddle along (Guardian)

This may be an era of economic turmoil, but people have little appetite for a radical alternative, writes Martin Kettle.

2. Honours are odious and harmful, and it's time they went (Independent)

At a time when the gap between the haves and have-nots is widening, titles exacerbate divisions, says Andreas Whittam Smith.

3. Mr Goodwin, and why honours must never again be scattered like confetti (Daily Mail)

A knighthood or damehood should go only to those with an impeccable record of conduct and conspicuous achievement, says Simon Heffer.

4. Does Britain despise the idea of making money? (Daily Telegraph)

The political class, led by a Conservative Prime Minister, has shown an unhealthy enthusiasm for playing to the mob in the Fred Goodwin affair, argues a Daily Telegraph leader.

5. Cameron isn't a lucky leader, but Miliband is (Independent)

Miliband's response to events has had more impact than that ofany leader of the opposition in recent times, writes Steve Richards.

6. The BBC's distortion of the truth helps Putin suppress his critics (Daily Telegraph)

A revealing documentary - Putin, Russia and the West - is all very well, but it shouldn't play into a tyrant's hands, says Peter Oborne.

7. Just like Scotland, Britain needs its referendum too (Guardian)

David Cameron wants devo max for Britain in Europe, writes Timothy Garton Ash. His fear of direct democracy will land us with the worst of both worlds.

8. The trials of a reluctant superpower (Financial Times)

As commercial needs suck it into a troubled world, China's desire for a low international profile is at odds with reality, says David Pilling.

9. George Osborne's budget: time to think big (Guardian)

Economists routinely describe the climate as challenging, when what they really mean is 'absolutely awful', says a Guardian leader.

10. Britain's best new export: lessons in intelligent fiscal policy (Financial Times)

The UK's main disease was overconfidence in its strength before the crisis, writes Chris Giles.