Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's newspapers.

1. How to defuse the bonus bomb in one move (Times) (£)

Simon Wolfson argues that the riskier a bank's business, the less it should be allowed to pay staff. That's fair to shareholders, taxpayers and savers.

2. Don't put venture capital at risk (Financial Times)

John Gapper warns that the industry is on the same threshold that both banking and private equity crossed before, with unintended consequences.

3. The rule of law in Britain is diminished by the furore over efforts to deport Abu Qatada to Jordan (Daily Telegraph)

The British parliament has lost sight of the noble principles that Strasbourg has upheld, says Peter Oborne.

4. Call Strasbourg's bluff: send Qatada home (Times) (£)

Camilla Cavendish argues that Britain must stand up for itself as the European Court of Human Rights interferes in affairs well beyond its remit.

5. Angela Merkel needs all the help she can get (Guardian)

Few had anticipated the leadership dilemmas of a European Germany in a German Europe, says Timothy Garton Ash.

6. Run the NHS better or scrap it -- but give up reforming it (Independent)

"Patient choice" is largely a myth, says Steve Richards -- unless we pay for half-empty hospital wards.

7. Ignore the soporific jargon. Privatisation is a race to the bottom (Guardian)

The outsourcing of state services always leads to workers being paid less, says Zoe Williams. Instead our leaders call it an "efficiency saving".

8. US Presidential campaign: Never has the good news sounded so bad (Daily Telegraph)

Anne Applebaum says that the sudden growth of the US economy spells trouble for Democrats as well as Republicans.

9. Where Wukan has led, Beijing won't follow (Financial Times)

Village protesters in China will not unnerve the state, says David Pilling.

10. Sweetheart tax deals aren't for the little people (Independent)

Andreas Whittam Smith suggests that Harry Redknapp's problem was that he was a private individual and not a large company.

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It's Gary Lineker 1, the Sun 0

The football hero has found himself at the heart of a Twitter storm over the refugee children debate.

The Mole wonders what sort of topsy-turvy universe we now live in where Gary Lineker is suddenly being called a “political activist” by a Conservative MP? Our favourite big-eared football pundit has found himself in a war of words with the Sun newspaper after wading into the controversy over the age of the refugee children granted entry into Britain from Calais.

Pictures published earlier this week in the right-wing press prompted speculation over the migrants' “true age”, and a Tory MP even went as far as suggesting that these children should have their age verified by dental X-rays. All of which leaves your poor Mole with a deeply furrowed brow. But luckily the British Dental Association was on hand to condemn the idea as unethical, inaccurate and inappropriate. Phew. Thank God for dentists.

Back to old Big Ears, sorry, Saint Gary, who on Wednesday tweeted his outrage over the Murdoch-owned newspaper’s scaremongering coverage of the story. He smacked down the ex-English Defence League leader, Tommy Robinson, in a single tweet, calling him a “racist idiot”, and went on to defend his right to express his opinions freely on his feed.

The Sun hit back in traditional form, calling for Lineker to be ousted from his job as host of the BBC’s Match of the Day. The headline they chose? “Out on his ears”, of course, referring to the sporting hero’s most notable assets. In the article, the tabloid lays into Lineker, branding him a “leftie luvvie” and “jug-eared”. The article attacked him for describing those querying the age of the young migrants as “hideously racist” and suggested he had breached BBC guidelines on impartiality.

All of which has prompted calls for a boycott of the Sun and an outpouring of support for Lineker on Twitter. His fellow football hero Stan Collymore waded in, tweeting that he was on “Team Lineker”. Leading the charge against the Murdoch-owned title was the close ally of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and former Channel 4 News economics editor, Paul Mason, who tweeted:

Lineker, who is not accustomed to finding himself at the centre of such highly politicised arguments on social media, responded with typical good humour, saying he had received a bit of a “spanking”.

All of which leaves the Mole with renewed respect for Lineker and an uncharacteristic desire to watch this weekend’s Match of the Day to see if any trace of his new activist persona might surface.


I'm a mole, innit.