Web Only: best of the blogs

The five must-read blogs from today, including the key dangers in the health bill.

1. Key dangers in the Health and Social Care bill

At False Economy, Richard Blogger explains how the health bill opens the NHS up to privatisation and closes its democratic structures down.

2. Why Britain will always be at the mercy of the markets

The flipside of running the world's banks is that we are most vulnerable to their losses, says the Telegraph's Daniel Knowles.

3. Majority of Lib Dem members back Coalition's benefits cap

At Liberal Democrat Voice, Stephen Tall reports that 59 per cent of Lib Dem members back a benefits cap of £26,000 or lower.

4. Growth in jobs probably not enough to bring down unemployment

Over at Left Foot Forward, Richard Exell analyses the data behind today's headlines about growth in jobs.

5. Holy Santorum!

Marbury's Ian Leslie suggests that Rick Santorum, not Newt Gingrich, is now Mitt Romney's most dangerous opponent.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.