Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. End this masochism in economic policy (Financial Times)

Prolonged stagnation and high unemployment will permanently lower the economy's potential, writes Martin Wolf. But there is an alternative.

2. The welfare reform bill will incentivise people: to turn on David Cameron (Guardian)

David Cameron's cuts have barely got going yet, writes Polly Toynbee. That's the frightening truth about austerity.

3. If Labour ditched David and Ed Miliband, it could actually win an election (Daily Telegraph)

Labour holds all the cards, but its leadership doesn't know how to play them, says Fraser Nelson.

4. Ed shouldn't get too excited about François (Times) (£)

If Hollande wins in France and Obama in the US, it doesn't follow that the Left in Britain would regain power, writes Philip Collins.

5. Red light for bonuses at Network Rail (Daily Mail)

Sir David Higgins and his Network Rail colleagues should waive their bonuses, argues a Daily Mail editorial.

6. An alarming outbreak of constitutional vandalism (Daily Telegraph)

The Conservatives should know better than to tinker with the constitution, says a Daily Telegraph editorial.

7. My solution to the Falklands problem: sell them (Independent)

I doubt we have much stomach for another war in the south Atlantic, writes Philip Hensher. And we need the money.

8. Alain de Botton's atheist temple is a nice idea, but a defunct one (Guardian)

De Botton's atheist temple call does not need to be realised - our existing places of worship can be appreciated by all, argues John Gray.

9. Israel will not pull out of the next Middle East war until Hizbollah is annihilated (Daily Telegraph)

The tension on the Lebanese border is palpable as sworn enemies flex their military muscle, writes Con Coughlin.

10. Egypt's generals will soon hear the final whistle (Independent)

If the British tend to believe in the cock-up theory of history, in the Middle East it's the opposite, says Adrian Hamilton.

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To stop Jeremy Corbyn, I am giving my second preference to Andy Burnham

The big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Voting is now underway in the Labour leadership election. There can be no doubt that Jeremy Corbyn is the frontrunner, but the race isn't over yet.

I know from conversations across the country that many voters still haven't made up their mind.

Some are drawn to Jeremy's promises of a new Jerusalem and endless spending, but worried that these endless promises, with no credibility, will only serve to lose us the next general election.

Others are certain that a Jeremy victory is really a win for Cameron and Osborne, but don't know who is the best alternative to vote for.

I am supporting Liz Kendall and will give her my first preference. But polling data is brutally clear: the big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Andy can win. He can draw together support from across the party, motivated by his history of loyalty to the Labour movement, his passionate appeal for unity in fighting the Tories, and the findings of every poll of the general public in this campaign that he is best placed candidate to win the next general election.

Yvette, in contrast, would lose to Jeremy Corbyn and lose heavily. Evidence from data collected by all the campaigns – except (apparently) Yvette's own – shows this. All publicly available polling shows the same. If Andy drops out of the race, a large part of the broad coalition he attracts will vote for Jeremy. If Yvette is knocked out, her support firmly swings behind Andy.

We will all have our views about the different candidates, but the real choice for our country is between a Labour government and the ongoing rightwing agenda of the Tories.

I am in politics to make a real difference to the lives of my constituents. We are all in the Labour movement to get behind the beliefs that unite all in our party.

In the crucial choice we are making right now, I have no doubt that a vote for Jeremy would be the wrong choice – throwing away the next election, and with it hope for the next decade.

A vote for Yvette gets the same result – her defeat by Jeremy, and Jeremy's defeat to Cameron and Osborne.

In the crucial choice between Yvette and Andy, Andy will get my second preference so we can have the best hope of keeping the fight for our party alive, and the best hope for the future of our country too.

Tom Blenkinsop is the Labour MP for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland