Huhne resigns from the cabinet

Lib Dem resigns as Energy Secretary and says he is "innocent of these charges".

As expected, Chris Huhne has fallen on his sword. Here's his statement, which he has just made outside his London flat.

The Crown Prosecution Service's decision today is deeply regrettable.

I am innocent of these charges and I intend to fight this in the courts and I am confident that a jury will agree. So as to avoid any distraction to either my official duties or my trial defence I am standing down and resigning as energy and climate change secretary. I will of course continue to serve my constituents in Eastleigh. Thank you and that's all I want to say today.

And here's the statement his former wife Vicky Pryce, who has also been charged by police, has issued through her lawyers:

As the CPS have decided to prosecute it would not be appropriate to comment further at this stage.

Obviously I hope for a quick resolution of the case. In the meantime I will be taking a little time off over the next few days to be with my family.

As I wrote earlier, there will now be a limited reshuffle with Ed Davey, the employment minister and Vince Cable's deputy, likely to replace Huhne as Energy Secretary, and Norman Lamb, Clegg's chief of staff, expected to take over Davey's brief.

Update: And here's Huhne's resignation statement in video form.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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