Web Only: the best of the blogs

The five must-read blogs from today, including the Germany-bashing at Davos.

1. 'Radical' Cameron joins in the Davos Germany-bashing

Germany's approach is being critiqued left, right, and centre, notes Channel 4's Faisal Islam.

2. Some thoughts on raising the personal allowance

Any stimulus that might actually have some impact on growth should be welcomed, says Duncan Weldon at the Touchstone blog.

3. What does George Osborne get in return for Nick Clegg's tax cut?

A Conservative Chancellor should be wary of accepting the redistributive logic behind Clegg's scheme, says the Telegraph's Benedict Brogan.

4. United we stand - keep the link

At Labour Uncut, John Spellar argues that this is no time for the unions to distance themselves from Labour.

5. Busting the means testing myth

Reducing the universality of benefits ultimately harms the very poorest in society, says Andrew Harrop at Left Foot Forward.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.