Morning call: the pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's newspapers.

1. Viscount Astor, you really are a class apart (Observer)

The rich bleat that times are hard and there's a socialist conspiracy to rob them of their wealth and property. Nonsense, says Nick Cohen.

2. There's more to politics than nice v nasty (Sunday Telegraph)

Newt Gingrich's attack on Mitt Romney was not merely a longing for revenge, says Janet Daley.

3. What a tragic wasted opportunity to present a true portrait of the Iron Lady (Observer)

Phyllida Lloyd has really missed a trick with her film about Margaret Thatcher, writes Stewart Lee.

4. This is new all right. It just isn't enough (Independent on Sunday)

Labour's acceptance yesterday of the Tory case for cuts is welcome, but Miliband and Balls still look like a losing team, says John Rentoul.

5. Mitt's Big Love (New York Times)

Democrats and independents may have fallen out of love with President Obama, but Republicans and independents can't fall in love with Mitt Romney, writes Maureen Dowd.

6. The Lords are the only decent politicians left (Mail on Sunday)

Suzanne Moore on the Welfare Reform Bill.

7. Looks do count, Ed, but it's conviction that voters like most (Independent on Sunday)

Janet Street-Porter claims that Miliband exudes desperation, and that's never an appealing quality in any man.

8. A tale of two Camerons and a return to Victorian values (Sunday Telegraph)

HS2 demonstrates how the PM's visionary instincts are prevailing over his love of the countryside, writes Matthew D'Ancona.

9. Why is Europe a dirty word? (New York Times)

Quelle horreur! One of the uglier revelations about President Obama emerging from the Republican primaries is that he is trying to turn the United States into Europe, writes Nicholas Kristof.

10. Ken Clarke is ready to betray 800 years of British justice (Observer)

The security and justice green paper threatens to deprive us of one of the vital traditions of common law, writes Henry Porter.

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Nineties boyband 5ive pull out of pro-Brexit concert, after learning it was “political”

“As a band, Five have no political allegiances.”

I woke up today with this feeling that better things are coming my way. One of those better things was Leave.EU’s BPop Live, the bizarre pro-Brexit concert at the NEC arena in Birmingham. With a line-up including Nineties stars 5ive, Alesha Dixon and East 17, as well as speeches from Nigel Farage, Dr Liam Fox and Kate Hoey, it was sure to be deliciously awkward fun.

But those halcyon days were over as soon as they began. Reports are now circling that the two original members of 5ive who had signed up to the gig, Ritchie Neville and Scott Robinson, have cancelled their appearance after realising that this was, in fact, a political concert.

A spokesperson told the Mirror:

When Rich and Scott agreed to play the event they understood that it was a pop concert funded by one of the Brexit organisations and not a political rally.

Ah, one of those non-political Brexit-funded concerts, then.

As it has come to light that this is more a political rally with entertainment included they have both decided to cancel their involvement. They would like to make it clear that as a band Five have no political allegiances or opinions for either side.

5ive have no political allegiance. They are lone wolves, making their way in this world with nothing but a thirst for vigilante justice. 5ive are the resident president, the 5th element. They know no allegiances. (Also, it’s 5ive with a 5, I will have it no other way.)

Their allegiance is first and foremost to their fans.

Ok, I’m tearing up now. I pledge allegiance to the band

A divide between two members of the Nineties’ best-loved boybands is terrifying to imagine. They must have felt like they should have been screaming, trying to get through to their friends. Sometimes, it feels that life has no meaning, but, if I know 5ive, things will be alright in the end. For truly, who else can get on up, when they’re down?

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.