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Morning call: the pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's newspapers.

1. Viscount Astor, you really are a class apart (Observer)

The rich bleat that times are hard and there's a socialist conspiracy to rob them of their wealth and property. Nonsense, says Nick Cohen.

2. There's more to politics than nice v nasty (Sunday Telegraph)

Newt Gingrich's attack on Mitt Romney was not merely a longing for revenge, says Janet Daley.

3. What a tragic wasted opportunity to present a true portrait of the Iron Lady (Observer)

Phyllida Lloyd has really missed a trick with her film about Margaret Thatcher, writes Stewart Lee.

4. This is new all right. It just isn't enough (Independent on Sunday)

Labour's acceptance yesterday of the Tory case for cuts is welcome, but Miliband and Balls still look like a losing team, says John Rentoul.

5. Mitt's Big Love (New York Times)

Democrats and independents may have fallen out of love with President Obama, but Republicans and independents can't fall in love with Mitt Romney, writes Maureen Dowd.

6. The Lords are the only decent politicians left (Mail on Sunday)

Suzanne Moore on the Welfare Reform Bill.

7. Looks do count, Ed, but it's conviction that voters like most (Independent on Sunday)

Janet Street-Porter claims that Miliband exudes desperation, and that's never an appealing quality in any man.

8. A tale of two Camerons and a return to Victorian values (Sunday Telegraph)

HS2 demonstrates how the PM's visionary instincts are prevailing over his love of the countryside, writes Matthew D'Ancona.

9. Why is Europe a dirty word? (New York Times)

Quelle horreur! One of the uglier revelations about President Obama emerging from the Republican primaries is that he is trying to turn the United States into Europe, writes Nicholas Kristof.

10. Ken Clarke is ready to betray 800 years of British justice (Observer)

The security and justice green paper threatens to deprive us of one of the vital traditions of common law, writes Henry Porter.

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