News International payouts: photo gallery

News International has paid out more than £600,000 in damages to 18 victims of phone hacking, plus l

A dizzying number of celebrities, public figures, and ordinary people caught up in the crossfire were sucked into the phone-hacking scandal last year. And hacked phones have resulted in legal cases. Lots of them.

Indeed, in April last year, News International set up a £20m compensation scheme in an attempt to settle the claims before they reached the high court. Today, some of those settlements were announced.

Here is a full list of the payouts announced today (including those in the photo gallery above, and some others):

- Jude Law, actor: £130,000
- Sadie Frost, actress and former wife of Law: £50,000

- Ben Jackson, former assistant to Law: £40,000

- Ciara Parkes, former PR consultant to Law and Sienna Miller: £35,000

- John Prescott, former deputy Prime Minister: £40,000

- Joan Hammell, former chief of staff to Prescott: £30,000

- Denis Macshane, Labour MP and former Europe minister: £32,000

- Joan Smith, author and journalist who had a relationship with Macshane: £27,500

- Gavin Henson, Welsh rugby player and former husband of Charlotte Church: £40,000

- Chris Bryant, Labour MP: £30,000

- Ashley Cole, footballer, formerly married to Cheryl Cole: undisclosed

- Guy Pelly, friend of Prince Harry’s: £40,000

- Lisa Gower, who allegedly had an affair with Steve Coogan: £30,000

- Tom Rowland, property lawyer: £25,000

- Graham Shear, football lawyer: £25,000

- Christopher Shipman, son of Harold: undisclosed "substantial" amount

- Clare Ward, Labour MP: undisclosed

- Anonymous claimant HJK: £60,000

All in all, it's been rather an expensive day for News International -- particularly bearing in mind that these amounts are on top of legal costs. Several other settlements have already been made with celebrities including Ulrika Jonnson, Calum Best and James Hewitt.

And it's not over yet. On 13 February, a full hearing will take place at the High Court. Those claimants are Sky Andrew, Laura Rooney, Charlotte Church, Steve Coogan, Simon Hughes MP, Tracey Temple, Kieran Fallon, Pete Doherty, Sally King, Andrew King and John Anderson, Samantha Wallin

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.