Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Alex Salmond's wish is for a home rule option for Scotland -- and he'll get it (Guardian)

Martin Kettle warns that the now imminent date for the Scottish referendum leaves little time for the consideration of its impact on the rest of the UK.

2. If the benefit cap doesn't fit, don't wear it (Times) (£)

The limit of £26,000 is easy to understand but is largely symbolic, says David Aaronovitch. The trouble is, it's unfair on too many people.

3. Meddle with the market at your peril (Financial Times)

No other system, from Fabian socialism to Soviet-style communism, has met its people's needs, writes Alan Greenspan.

4. Hayek helped us to find capitalism's flaws (Financial Times)

We work more like a market than business does, write Occupy London.

5. In a sombre year Davos worries about greater equality (Independent)

Hamish McRae notes that on the difficulty of delivering equity, though, developed and emerging economies are alike.

6. Fear may well save the euro. Now for the politics of hope (Guardian)

We must recognise that stability of the eurozone is no substitute for the larger project it was designed to usher in, says Timothy Garton Ash.

7. Europe: rumours of its demise are exaggerated (Times) (£)

At Christmas catastrophe seemed inevitable, says Camilla Cavendish. Now, thanks to the two Marios, the outlook is far brighter.

8. Hester and Huhne are symbols of a country in moral freefall (Daily Telegraph)

Small wonder young people are becoming less honest, given the example they are set, writes Peter Oborne.

9. Human rights: Cameron's message to Europe (Guardian)

The European court of human rights is not all David Cameron has his sights on, says Francesca Klug.

10, The State of the Contest (Times) (£)

President Obama's address to Congress set the election agenda, says this leading article.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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