Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Alex Salmond's wish is for a home rule option for Scotland -- and he'll get it (Guardian)

Martin Kettle warns that the now imminent date for the Scottish referendum leaves little time for the consideration of its impact on the rest of the UK.

2. If the benefit cap doesn't fit, don't wear it (Times) (£)

The limit of £26,000 is easy to understand but is largely symbolic, says David Aaronovitch. The trouble is, it's unfair on too many people.

3. Meddle with the market at your peril (Financial Times)

No other system, from Fabian socialism to Soviet-style communism, has met its people's needs, writes Alan Greenspan.

4. Hayek helped us to find capitalism's flaws (Financial Times)

We work more like a market than business does, write Occupy London.

5. In a sombre year Davos worries about greater equality (Independent)

Hamish McRae notes that on the difficulty of delivering equity, though, developed and emerging economies are alike.

6. Fear may well save the euro. Now for the politics of hope (Guardian)

We must recognise that stability of the eurozone is no substitute for the larger project it was designed to usher in, says Timothy Garton Ash.

7. Europe: rumours of its demise are exaggerated (Times) (£)

At Christmas catastrophe seemed inevitable, says Camilla Cavendish. Now, thanks to the two Marios, the outlook is far brighter.

8. Hester and Huhne are symbols of a country in moral freefall (Daily Telegraph)

Small wonder young people are becoming less honest, given the example they are set, writes Peter Oborne.

9. Human rights: Cameron's message to Europe (Guardian)

The European court of human rights is not all David Cameron has his sights on, says Francesca Klug.

10, The State of the Contest (Times) (£)

President Obama's address to Congress set the election agenda, says this leading article.

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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"