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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Bash the poor and wave the flag - how this Tory trick works (Guardian)

Jonathan Freedland explains how in a move imported from the US right, the Conservatives have successfully induced people to vote against their own interests.

2. This is a question of honour for the coalition -- not Stephen Hester (Daily Telegraph)

To do difficult things, the government must stand behind its own policies and people, says Charles Moore.

3. It's a crisis of confidence, not of capitalism (Financial Times)

We must return to the principles of the free market, writes George Osborne.

4. The Days of Our Youth (Times) (£)

European leaders need to tackle their terrible rates of youth unemployment, says leading article.

5. Philanthropy is the enemy of justice (Guardian)

The world's poor are not begging for charity from the rich, says Robert Newman -- they're asking for justice and fairness.

6. The outsider who has run foul of the FSA (Financial Times)

David Einhorn, the fund titan who shorted Lehman, has sold himself short, write Sam Jones and Dan McCrum.

7. Why protesters should occupy London 2012 (Times) (£)

Giles Coren writes that instead of banning tents from the Olympics, we should give medals for formal displays of civil disobedience.

8. Hornby: the end of the line (Guardian)

If play is the work of childhood, says Andrew Martin, Hornby's struggle is grim news for the future of UK manufacturing.

9. Class warfare need not be taxing (Financial Times)

The pragmatic case for socking it to the rich is weak, said Christopher Caldwell.

10. God may not be great, but religion can be (Times) (£)

Janice Turner writes how as a teenage atheist, she removed Jesus from the Nativity scene. Now she has realised that something is missing.