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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Don't blame the ratings agencies for the eurozone turmoil (Guardian)

Europe and the eurozone are strangling themselves with a toxic mixture of austerity and a structurally flawed financial system, says Ha-Joon Chang.

2. The SNP can't make the rules and be the ref (Times) (£)

When it comes to the vote it will be about the questions the Nationalists refuse to answer, says Jim Murphy.

3. For too many African-Americans, prison is a legacy passed from father to son (Guardian)

Today is Martin Luther King Day, writes Gary Younge. But with more African-American men facing jail than were enslaved in 1870, there is little to celebrate.

4. What happens when even your supporters don't believe in you? (Independent)

The problem is that Ed Miliband is too clever, unlike Neil Kinnock, who didn't seem clever enough, says Mary Ann Sieghart.

5. There is a golden opportunity to be seized in Asia (Daily Telegraph)

A strong relationship with Asia is a central part of the government's economic strategy, writes George Osborne.

6. After the downgrades comes the downward spiral (Financial Times)

The eurozone has exhausted its toolkit, says Wolfgang Munchau.

7. The only way to save the Union is to stop throwing cash at the Scots - and treat them as equals (Daily Mail)

Cameron should reduce or abolish altogether those anachronistic subsidies from Westminster, argues Melanie Phillips.

8. The Costa Concordia disaster highlights the dangers of super-sized cruise ships (Guardian)

Rapid developments in passenger shipping have not kept pace with safety requirements: this is a wake-up call to the industry, says Andrew Linington.

9. The Church of England needs to forget its silliness about homosexuality (Independent)

The Church's double-speak condemns people to a life without the joy of sexual intimacy, says Chris Bryant.

10. When a Tea Party-style folly comes to Nigeria (Financial Times)

Petrol-subsidy protests are against much needed reform, writes Paul Collier.