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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers

1. Words won't change capitalism. So be daring and do something (The Observer)
Western governments must replace their redundant inflation targets with a target for the growth of the value of the goods and service they produce, says Will Hutton

2. The trouble is we don't have true capitalism (The Sunday Times £)
The problem we have at the moment is not capitalism, but its absence, writes Dominic Lawson

3. Do you want the market or the market? (The Independent on Sunday)
Cameron and Miliband compete to bash the bankers, but they both intend to safeguard the capitalist system in Britain, says John Rentoul

4. We're proudly Scottish - but still British (Independent on Sunday)
Narrow nationalism is not what Scotland - nor the United Kingdom - needs in the debate about independence, writes Douglas Alexander

5. The good ship NHS needs a steer, Dave ( The Sunday Times £)
Cameron must also take the lead on remaking the argument for health reform, if that is what he intends, says Martin Ivens

6. America has the opportunity to usher in radical new political era (The Observer)
If super-rich Mitt Romney wins the Republican nomination, the US can have a real debate on income disparity, says Michael Cohen

7. Fresh Doubts About Republican Contest (New York Times)
The South Carolina result raises the likelihood of a primary battle stretching well into springtime, says Jeff Zeleny

8. Which Romney will show up now? (Washington Post)
He has shown many faces, but now caught in a revived race, his game face may change, again, writes Philip Rucker

9. Labour has finally decided to join the grown-ups' table (The Sunday Telegraph)
Ed Balls and Ed Miliband showed signs of a willingness to capitulate to reality, says Matthew d'Ancona

10. Only the super six can break the shackles of Coalition (The Mail on Sunday)
The Tories are now ruthlessly focused on making sure that next time they get to govern on their own