Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's newspapers.

1. It's welfare, not wealth, that will define Ed Miliband's leadership (Daily Telegraph)

Labour's reluctance to stand up for those in greatest need leaves it in no man's land, says Mary Riddell.

2. Welfare cap: it's not about the money (Guardian)

Gavin Poole argues that opponents of the cap on benefits fail to see that it will raise self-esteem and break the cycle of poverty.

3. NHS reform should be dropped, before it's too late (Independent)

Steve Richards says that "sweeping upheaval" is a polite way of expressing the chaos that is being imposed.

4. Barack Obama has reasons to smile again (Daily Telegraph)

The president's future looks more hopeful, says Alex Spillius -- the US economy is recovering, Republicans are weak and he is untainted by scandal.

5. The real debate that America needs (Financial Times)

Romney and Obama are the men to set the agenda, says Gideon Rachman.

6.For Greece default is the only option (Guardian)

Costas Lapavitsas says that the dreadful debt saga will only come to a close when Greece takes charge of its predicament.

7. We want a deal with Iran, not a war (Independent)

The EU decision yesterday to ban imports of Iranian oil makes even more perilous a confrontation that could yet lead to war, warns this leading article.

8. Economic uncertainty is no excuse for inaction (Financial Times)

Increasing demand is the way back to economic health, writes Lawrence Summers.

9. Hockney's painted message for the politicos (Times) (£)

Britain's greatest living artist uses modern means to convey traditional themes. Rachel Sylvester says that MPs of all colours should take heed.

10. Courage: a product of practice rather than faith (Guardian)

Giles Fraser discusses the question of moral courage and whether you can get better at it.

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PMQs review: Theresa May shows again that Brexit means hard Brexit

The Prime Minister's promise of "an end to free movement" is incompatible with single market membership. 

Theresa May, it is commonly said, has told us nothing about Brexit. At today's PMQs, Jeremy Corbyn ran with this line, demanding that May offer "some clarity". In response, as she has before, May stated what has become her defining aim: "an end to free movement". This vow makes a "hard Brexit" (or "chaotic Brexit" as Corbyn called it) all but inevitable. The EU regards the "four freedoms" (goods, capital, services and people) as indivisible and will not grant the UK an exemption. The risk of empowering eurosceptics elsewhere is too great. Only at the cost of leaving the single market will the UK regain control of immigration.

May sought to open up a dividing line by declaring that "the Labour Party wants to continue with free movement" (it has refused to rule out its continuation). "I want to deliver on the will of the British people, he is trying to frustrate the British people," she said. The problem is determining what the people's will is. Though polls show voters want control of free movement, they also show they want to maintain single market membership. It is not only Boris Johnson who is pro-having cake and pro-eating it. 

Corbyn later revealed that he had been "consulting the great philosophers" as to the meaning of Brexit (a possible explanation for the non-mention of Heathrow, Zac Goldsmith's resignation and May's Goldman Sachs speech). "All I can come up with is Baldrick, who says our cunning plan is to have no plan," he quipped. Without missing a beat, May replied: "I'm interested that [he] chose Baldrick, of course the actor playing Baldrick was a member of the Labour Party, as I recall." (Tony Robinson, a Corbyn critic ("crap leader"), later tweeted that he still is one). "We're going to deliver the best possible deal in goods and services and we're going to deliver an end to free movement," May continued. The problem for her is that the latter aim means that the "best possible deal" may be a long way from the best. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.