Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's newspapers.

1. Welfare cuts: Cameron's problem is that people are nicer than he thinks (Guardian)

Polly Toynbee predicts that when these welfare changes come into force, their savage effect will be seen -- and then the public mood will turn.

2. We need some tough love to get people off welfare and into Pret (Daily Telegraph)

Fraser Nelson argues that ministers should face down the Lords over benefit curbs -- the workers are on their side.

3. Ed's plan for Britain: be more like Germany (Times) (£)

Few took note of the Labour leader's speech on the crisis in capitalism, says Philip Collins. But its ideas would change our country.

4. Britain's reputation is in the dock over rendition (Independent)

Questions have been raised about the UK's line between decency and realpolitik, says this leading article.

5. Politics and the American language (Financial Times)

Orwell provides some of the best commentary for those interested in the Republican debates, says Gary Silverman.

6. Freedom is still flowering in the Arab Spring (Times) (£)

Violence and votes for Islamism are a setback but this was never a quick fix. William Hague reiterates that the coalition will do all it can to aid democracy.

7. 'Devo max' would make Scotland fiscally responsible -- why does Cameron oppose it? (Guardian)

Only a tribalistic craving for central control explains the prime minister's urge to defend the UK against Scottish autonomy, says Simon Jenkins.

8. An informal addition to the laws of physics -- don't work for Iran (Daily Telegraph)

The covert war behind the latest assassination in Tehran raises moral concerns, says Michael Burleigh.

9. This is not about 'bad apples'. This is the horror of war (Independent)

How many other abuses took place off camera, asks Robert Fisk.

10. The market still has no rivals (Financial Times)

Samuel Brittain argues that the central case for the competitive capitalist system is that it promotes both personal and political freedom.

Photo: National Theatre
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I hate musicals. Apart from Guys and Dolls, South Pacific, Follies – oh, wait

Every second is designed to be pleasing, so that by the end my face aches from all the smiling.

I always thought I hated musicals. Showy, flamboyant, and minutely choreographed, they seemed to be the antithesis of the minimalist indie scene I grew up in, where a ramshackle DIY ethos prevailed, where it wasn’t cool to be too professional, too slick, too stagey. My immersion in that world coincided with the heady days of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s triumphs in the West End – Evita in 1978, Cats in 1981 – neither of which I saw, being full of scorn for such shows.

From then on I convinced myself that musicals were not for me, conveniently forgetting my childhood love of West Side Story (for which I’d bought the piano music, bashing out “I Feel Pretty” over and over again in the privacy of the dining room, on the small upright that was wedged in behind the door).

I was also conveniently forgetting Meet Me In St Louis and A Star is Born, as well as An American in Paris, which I’d been to see with a boy I was actually in a band with – he somehow finding it possible to combine a love of The Clash with a love of Gene Kelly. And I was pretending that Saturday Night Fever wasn’t really a musical, and neither was Cabaret – because that would mean my two favourite films of all time were musicals, and I didn’t like musicals.

Maybe what I meant was stage musicals? Yes, that was probably it. They were awful. I mean, not Funny Girl obviously. When people ask “If you could go back in time, what gig would you most like to have attended?” two of my answers are: “Judy Garland at Carnegie Hall, and Barbra Streisand in the original 1964 Broadway production of Funny Girl.” I would, of course, also make an exception for Guys and Dolls, and South Pacific, and My Fair Lady, and… oh God, what was I talking about? I’d always loved musicals, I just stopped remembering.

Then one of our teens took me to see Les Misérables. She’d become obsessed with it, loving the show so much she then went and read the Victor Hugo book – and loving that so much, she then re-read it in the original French. I know! Never tell me today’s young people are lazy and lacking in commitment. So I went with her to see the long-running stage version with my sceptical face on, one eyebrow fully arched, and by the time of Éponine’s death and “A Little Fall of Rain” I had practically wept both raised eyebrows off my face. Call me converted. Call me reminded.

I was late to Sondheim because of those years of prejudice, and I’ve been trying to catch up ever since, keeping my eyes open for London productions. Assassins at the Menier Chocolate Factory was stunning, and Imelda Staunton in Gypsy (yes, I know he only wrote the lyrics) was a revelation. Here she is again tonight in Follies at the National Theatre, the show that is in part a homage to the era of the Ziegfeld Follies, that period between the wars that some think of as the Golden Age of Musicals.

Although, as Sondheim writes in his extraordinary book, Finishing The Hat, (which contains his lyrics plus his comments on them and on everything else): “There are others who think of the Golden Age of Musicals as the 1950s, but then every generation thinks the Golden Age was the previous one.” How I would have loved to have seen those shows in the 1970s, when they were new and startling.

They still are, of course, and this production of Follies is a delight from start to finish. A masterclass in lyrics – Sondheim’s skill in writing for older women is unmatched – it is also sumptuously beautiful, full of emotion and sardonic wit, switching between the two in the blink of an eye, in a way that appears effortless.

And I realise that what I love about musicals is their utter commitment to the audience’s pleasure. Every second is designed to be pleasing, so that by the end my face aches from all the smiling, and my mascara has somehow become smudged from having something in my eye, and I have already booked tickets to go again. So sue me.

Tracey Thorn is a musician and writer, best known as one half of Everything but the Girl. She writes the fortnightly “Off the Record” column for the New Statesman. Her latest book is Naked at the Albert Hall.

This article first appeared in the 21 September 2017 issue of the New Statesman, The revenge of the left