Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's newspapers.

1. This Republican abuse of the system is not the American way (Guardian)

The centuries-old US political system is one to be admired. Yet ironically it's under threat from those who claim to be patriots, argues Jonathan Freedland.

2. We're all in the Union. We must all have a vote (The Times) (£)

Scottish independence would create two new countries. The whole of the UK must be consulted before it happens, writes Matthew Parris.

3. There was a time when bigger wasn't always better (Telegraph)

Women's body types have been admired for different reasons in different eras, writes Vicki Woods.

4. If everyone did a Worrall Thompson, maybe Tesco wouldn't be too big to fail (Guardian)

Tesco's poor results have led it to review its practices. The self-service tills used by Wozza may be a good place to start, says Marina Hyde.

5. A no vote in Scotland could leave England begging for mercy (Guardian)

Cameron thinks he's being clever by forcing Alex Salmond's hand. He really, really isn't, says Deborah Orr.

6. Britain's reputation is in the dock over rendition (Independent)

Questions have been raised about the UK's line between decency and realpolitik, says this leading article.

7. A close-up of Richard Desmond that I wasn't ready for (Telegraph)

There were worries for the mental welfare of one participant at the Leveson Inquiry, writes Matthew Norman.

8. One Falklands problem, one civilised solution (Times) (£)

One Falklands problem, one civilised solution, writes Simon Winchester.

9. Hang on, Mr Salmond. The English MUST have a say on Scotland's future too... (Daily Mail)

Simon Heffer on the future of the Union.

10. For the families of Haditha, this is a matter of honour (Guardian)

Botched inquiries and lies in the wake of the Haditha massacre in Iraq mean the victims' families are still waiting for justice, writes the documentary maker Nick Broomfield.

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Benn vs McDonnell: how Brexit has exposed the fight over Labour's party machine

In the wake of Brexit, should Labour MPs listen more closely to voters, or their own party members?

Two Labour MPs on primetime TV. Two prominent politicians ruling themselves out of a Labour leadership contest. But that was as far as the similarity went.

Hilary Benn was speaking hours after he resigned - or was sacked - from the Shadow Cabinet. He described Jeremy Corbyn as a "good and decent man" but not a leader.

Framing his overnight removal as a matter of conscience, Benn told the BBC's Andrew Marr: "I no longer have confidence in him [Corbyn] and I think the right thing to do would be for him to take that decision."

In Benn's view, diehard leftie pin ups do not go down well in the real world, or on the ballot papers of middle England. 

But while Benn may be drawing on a New Labour truism, this in turn rests on the assumption that voters matter more than the party members when it comes to winning elections.

That assumption was contested moments later by Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell.

Dismissive of the personal appeal of Shadow Cabinet ministers - "we can replace them" - McDonnell's message was that Labour under Corbyn had rejuvenated its electoral machine.

Pointing to success in by-elections and the London mayoral election, McDonnell warned would-be rebels: "Who is sovereign in our party? The people who are soverign are the party members. 

"I'm saying respect the party members. And in that way we can hold together and win the next election."

Indeed, nearly a year on from Corbyn's surprise election to the Labour leadership, it is worth remembering he captured nearly 60% of the 400,000 votes cast. Momentum, the grassroots organisation formed in the wake of his success, now has more than 50 branches around the country.

Come the next election, it will be these grassroots members who will knock on doors, hand out leaflets and perhaps even threaten to deselect MPs.

The question for wavering Labour MPs will be whether what they trust more - their own connection with voters, or this potentially unbiddable party machine.