The ‘phone hacking’ was despicable, but it wasn’t hacking

Private investigators hired by tabloids were ‘blaggers’, not hackers.

We now know that certain tabloids including the News of The World covertly gained access to the voicemails of all sorts of people, from celebrities, to the family of murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler. It was, as Robert Jay Q.C. described in his opening submission to the Leveson Inquiry, a "fishing expedition".

But while some have described the actions of the tabloids and the private investigators they hired as 'hacking', as far as we know thus far, it was nothing of the sort. What they did should really be described as communications interception, or if you want to use security parlance, default configuration attacks.

If the owner of a mobile phone does not set it up with a new voicemail password or PIN, it remains the default PIN set by the phone maker or telecoms operator. 1234, for example, or 0000. All that a private investigator then needs to listen to one's voicemails is the mobile phone number itself, and for the owner not to have changed the PIN.

So what the private investigators did was 'blag' the mobile phone numbers of their intended victims, either through social engineering techniques where you persuade a helpful person to divulge a mobile number by pretending to be someone else, or simply by paying someone at the phone company to give it out.

That is not to say that what the tabloids and the private investigators they hired was not despicable, and the Notw's royal affairs editor Clive Goodman and private investigator Glenn Mulcaire may not be the only persons deemed by the courts to have also acted criminally.

There are techniques that can be used to hack into mobile phone conversations themselves and also to snoop on text messages sent via mobile phones. GSM interceptors can do exactly that, but these are not something someone with little more than 'blagging' skills would be able to deploy. Companies, more sophisticated hackers and even governments do use them, but we're yet to hear evidence that these were used by the tabloids or private investigators under the Leveson Inquiry spotlight.

It's scary enough that corporations and governments use sophisticated cybercrime techniques to bypass internet and communications security. It's worth being that little bit more specific about the techniques that are being used in different situations, if we don't want the general response to be, 'there's nothing I can do about my online security: if someone wants to hack my voicemails I am sure they could'.

When really the response in this instance, along with the outrage, might also be, 'I should change my PIN'.

Jason Stamper is NS technology correspondent and editor of Computer Business Review.

Jason Stamper is editor of Computer Business Review

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Will Jeremy Corbyn stand down if Labour loses the general election?

Defeat at the polls might not be the end of Corbyn’s leadership.

The latest polls suggest that Labour is headed for heavy defeat in the June general election. Usually a general election loss would be the trigger for a leader to quit: Michael Foot, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband all stood down after their first defeat, although Neil Kinnock saw out two losses before resigning in 1992.

It’s possible, if unlikely, that Corbyn could become prime minister. If that prospect doesn’t materialise, however, the question is: will Corbyn follow the majority of his predecessors and resign, or will he hang on in office?

Will Corbyn stand down? The rules

There is no formal process for the parliamentary Labour party to oust its leader, as it discovered in the 2016 leadership challenge. Even after a majority of his MPs had voted no confidence in him, Corbyn stayed on, ultimately winning his second leadership contest after it was decided that the current leader should be automatically included on the ballot.

This year’s conference will vote on to reform the leadership selection process that would make it easier for a left-wing candidate to get on the ballot (nicknamed the “McDonnell amendment” by centrists): Corbyn could be waiting for this motion to pass before he resigns.

Will Corbyn stand down? The membership

Corbyn’s support in the membership is still strong. Without an equally compelling candidate to put before the party, Corbyn’s opponents in the PLP are unlikely to initiate another leadership battle they’re likely to lose.

That said, a general election loss could change that. Polling from March suggests that half of Labour members wanted Corbyn to stand down either immediately or before the general election.

Will Corbyn stand down? The rumours

Sources close to Corbyn have said that he might not stand down, even if he leads Labour to a crushing defeat this June. They mention Kinnock’s survival after the 1987 general election as a precedent (although at the 1987 election, Labour did gain seats).

Will Corbyn stand down? The verdict

Given his struggles to manage his own MPs and the example of other leaders, it would be remarkable if Corbyn did not stand down should Labour lose the general election. However, staying on after a vote of no-confidence in 2016 was also remarkable, and the mooted changes to the leadership election process give him a reason to hold on until September in order to secure a left-wing succession.

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