Top 5 political funnies of 2011

Herman Cain doesn't know what he thinks about Libya, Ed Miliband thinks "these strikes are wrong", a

1. Herman Cain struggles to recall details of Libya conflict

Here is presidential hopeful Herman Cain unable to say whether he agrees with Obama's actions in Libya: "Got all this stuff twirling around in my head," he says to explain his confusion. Remember, this man wanted to be PRESIDENT. Of AMERICA. He has since suspended his campaign after a string of sexual harrassment allegations.

  

2. Ed Miliband tongue-tied on strikes

Oh, Ed. This video of Miliband repeatedly telling a BBC interviewer that "these strikes are wrong" and "both sides should get round the negotiating table and put aside the rhetoric" might be evidence of him staying on-message, but it did nothing to help him shake the 'weird' thing.

  

 

3. Rick Perry forgets which government agency he would axe

The Republican primaries were the gift that just kept on giving in terms of hand-on-forehead moments. Here is Texas governor Rick Perry struggling to recall the name of the government department he would axe if he was elected. It's a masterclass in how not to draw attention to your failings.

  

4. Miliband forgets name of Scottish Labour candidate

If the Republicans had more than their fair share of "oops" moments, so did the Labour leader. Here he is, unable to name all of the candidates for the Scottish Labour leadership.

 

5. Nick Clegg's on-mike gaffe

Let's not forget Nick "punchbag" Clegg being caught on tape confirming every Lib Dem's worst fear about coalition. "If we keep doing this we won't have anything to bloody disagree on in the bloody TV debates," he tells Cameron, after another chummy press conference. Of course, this was before the AV referendum and Europe came along to create trouble in paradise.

 

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Scotland's vast deficit remains an obstacle to independence

Though the country's financial position has improved, independence would still risk severe austerity. 

For the SNP, the annual Scottish public spending figures bring good and bad news. The good news, such as it is, is that Scotland's deficit fell by £1.3bn in 2016/17. The bad news is that it remains £13.3bn or 8.3 per cent of GDP – three times the UK figure of 2.4 per cent (£46.2bn) and vastly higher than the white paper's worst case scenario of £5.5bn. 

These figures, it's important to note, include Scotland's geographic share of North Sea oil and gas revenue. The "oil bonus" that the SNP once boasted of has withered since the collapse in commodity prices. Though revenue rose from £56m the previous year to £208m, this remains a fraction of the £8bn recorded in 2011/12. Total public sector revenue was £312 per person below the UK average, while expenditure was £1,437 higher. Though the SNP is playing down the figures as "a snapshot", the white paper unambiguously stated: "GERS [Government Expenditure and Revenue Scotland] is the authoritative publication on Scotland’s public finances". 

As before, Nicola Sturgeon has warned of the threat posed by Brexit to the Scottish economy. But the country's black hole means the risks of independence remain immense. As a new state, Scotland would be forced to pay a premium on its debt, resulting in an even greater fiscal gap. Were it to use the pound without permission, with no independent central bank and no lender of last resort, borrowing costs would rise still further. To offset a Greek-style crisis, Scotland would be forced to impose dramatic austerity. 

Sturgeon is undoubtedly right to warn of the risks of Brexit (particularly of the "hard" variety). But for a large number of Scots, this is merely cause to avoid the added turmoil of independence. Though eventual EU membership would benefit Scotland, its UK trade is worth four times as much as that with Europe. 

Of course, for a true nationalist, economics is irrelevant. Independence is a good in itself and sovereignty always trumps prosperity (a point on which Scottish nationalists align with English Brexiteers). But if Scotland is to ever depart the UK, the SNP will need to win over pragmatists, too. In that quest, Scotland's deficit remains a vast obstacle. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.