Strong winds hit Scotland: in pictures

165mph hurricane-strength winds close schools and leave thousands without power.

All photos: Getty Images

The worst storm in a decade struck Scotland yesterday, leaving 150,000 homes without power and forcing schools, public buildings and businesses in all parts of the country -- including Glasgow and Edinburgh -- to close. The extreme winds, caused by a rapid drop in air pressure over the northern half of the UK, reached up to 165mph -- the speed of a Force 12 hurricane.

Cancelled trains, flights and ferries left hundreds of passengers stranded in railway stations and airports across Scotland and Northern Ireland. The Scottish government has today advised people in central areas to avoid travelling, and warned that some homes may not have their electricity reconnected until early next week. Over 70,000 Scottish Hydro customers are currently without power.

Some of the worst disruption has been caused across the Highlands, Aberdeenshire and Orkney, where there are fears today the islands will suffer further damage from high tides.

A major search and rescue operation was this morning launched in the Cairngorms for five hill-walkers who had not been heard from since Wednesday. A Royal Navy helicopter was used in the land and air search for the men, who have since been found safe.

Alice Gribbin is a Teaching-Writing Fellow at the Iowa Writers' Workshop. She was formerly the editorial assistant at the New Statesman.

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Tory Brexiter Daniel Hannan: Leave campaign never promised "radical decline" in immigration

The voters might not agree...

BBC Newsnight on Twitter

It was the Leave campaign's pledge to reduce EU immigration that won it the referendum. But Daniel Hannan struck a rather different tone on last night's Newsnight. "It means free movement of labour," the Conservative MEP said of the post-Brexit model he envisaged. An exasperated Evan Davis replied: “I’m sorry we’ve just been through three months of agony on the issue of immigration. The public have been led to believe that what they have voted for is an end to free movement." 

Hannan protested that EU migrants would lose "legal entitlements to live in other countries, to vote in other countries and to claim welfare and to have the same university tuition". But Davis wasn't backing down. "Why didn't you say this in the campaign? Why didn't you say in the campaign that you were wanting a scheme where we have free movement of labour? Come on, that's completely at odds with what the public think they have just voted for." 

Hannan concluded: "We never said there was going to be some radical decline ... we want a measure of control". Your Mole suspects many voters assumed otherwise. If immigration is barely changed, Hannan and others will soon be burned by the very fires they stoked. 

I'm a mole, innit.