Strong winds hit Scotland: in pictures

165mph hurricane-strength winds close schools and leave thousands without power.

All photos: Getty Images

The worst storm in a decade struck Scotland yesterday, leaving 150,000 homes without power and forcing schools, public buildings and businesses in all parts of the country -- including Glasgow and Edinburgh -- to close. The extreme winds, caused by a rapid drop in air pressure over the northern half of the UK, reached up to 165mph -- the speed of a Force 12 hurricane.

Cancelled trains, flights and ferries left hundreds of passengers stranded in railway stations and airports across Scotland and Northern Ireland. The Scottish government has today advised people in central areas to avoid travelling, and warned that some homes may not have their electricity reconnected until early next week. Over 70,000 Scottish Hydro customers are currently without power.

Some of the worst disruption has been caused across the Highlands, Aberdeenshire and Orkney, where there are fears today the islands will suffer further damage from high tides.

A major search and rescue operation was this morning launched in the Cairngorms for five hill-walkers who had not been heard from since Wednesday. A Royal Navy helicopter was used in the land and air search for the men, who have since been found safe.

Alice Gribbin is a Teaching-Writing Fellow at the Iowa Writers' Workshop. She was formerly the editorial assistant at the New Statesman.

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Donald Trump promises quick Brexit trade deal - but the pound still falls

The incoming President was talking to cast out Brexiteer, Michael Gove. 

The incoming President, Donald Trump, told the Brexiteer Michael Gove he would come up with a UK-US trade deal that was "good for both sides".

The man who styled himself "Mr Brexit" praised the vote in an interview for The Times

His belief that Britain is "doing great" is in marked contrast to the warning of current President, Barack Obama, that Brexit would put the country "at the back of the queue" for trade deals.

But while Brexiteers may be chuffed to have a friend in the White House, the markets think somewhat differently.

Over the past few days, reports emerged that the Prime Minister, Theresa May, is to outline plans for a "hard Brexit" with no guaranteed access to the single market in a speech on Tuesday.

The pound slipped to its lowest level against the dollar in three months, below $1.20, before creeping up slightly on Monday.

Nigel Green, founder and chief executive of the financial planners deVere Group, said on Friday: "A hard Brexit can be expected to significantly change the financial landscape. As such, people should start preparing for the shifting environment sooner rather than later."

It's hard to know the exact economic impact of Brexit, because Brexit - officially leaving the EU - hasn't happened yet. Brexiteers like Gove have attacked "experts" who they claim are simply talking down the economy. It is true that because of the slump in sterling, Britain's most international companies in the FTSE 100 are thriving. 

But the more that the government is forced to explain what it is hoping for, the better sense traders have of whether it will involve staying in the single market. And it seems that whatever the President-Elect says, they're not buying it.


 

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.