Hugo Chávez: Is the US giving Latin American leaders cancer?

The Venezuelan leader ponders whether the US could have "developed a technology to induce cancer".

Argentina's president, Cristina Fernandez, has been diagnosed with cancer -- and the news has been met with suspicion by Hugo Chávez.

The Venezulan leader, who was treated for cancer earlier this year, wonders whether the US could be to blame. In a televised speech to soldiers at an army base, he said:

Would it be strange if they had developed a technology to induce cancer, and for no one to know it?

Fernando Lugo of Paraguay, Dilma Rousseff of Brazil, and her predecessor, Lula da Silva, have also battled cancer in recent years. While Chávez was careful to say that he didn't want to "make any reckless accusations", he said that he finds the number of cancer cases "very, very, very strange".

He noted that US government scientists had infected Guatemalan prisoners with syphilis and other diseases in the 1940s, which only came to light recently, and joked that he'd take extra care of the presidents of Bolivia and Ecuador lest they be struck down with cancer too.

 

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Italian PM Matteo Renzi resigns after referendum No vote

Europe's right-wing populists cheered the result. 

Italy's centrist Prime Minister Matteo Renzi was forced to resign late on Sunday after he lost a referendum on constitutional change.

With most ballots counted, 60 per cent of Italians voted No to change, according to the BBC. The turn out was nearly 70 per cent. 

Voters were asked whether they backed a reform to Italy's complex political system, but right-wing populists have interpreted the referendum as a wider poll on the direction of the country.

Before the result, former Ukip leader Nigel Farage tweeted: "Hope the exit polls in Italy are right. This vote looks to me to be more about the Euro than constitutional change."

The leader of France's far-right Front National, Marine Le Pen, tweeted "bravo" to her Eurosceptic "friend" Matteo Salvini, a politician who campaigned for the No vote. She described the referendum result as a "thirst for liberty". 

In his resignation speech, Renzi told reporters he took responsibility for the outcome and added "good luck to us all". 

Since gaining office in 2014, Renzi has been a reformist politician. He introduced same-sex civil unions, made employment laws more flexible and abolished small taxes, and was known by some as "Europe's last Blairite".

However, his proposed constitutional reforms divided opinion even among liberals, because of the way they removed certain checks and balances and handed increased power to the government.

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.