Miliband needs entrepreneur evangelists

The Labour leader's critique of "predatory" capitalism would be more effective delivered by experien

In a speech yesterday Ed Miliband set out in more detail the economic thesis he first outlined in his speech to the Labour party conference. It is, in essence, that there are deep structural flaws in the way British capitalism works. There has, the Labour leader believes, been too much emphasis on short-term profit-seeking and not enough consideration for long-term investment. The UK economy has become host to too much "predatory" behaviour and should foster more sustainable, responsible, "productive" business practices.

When Miliband first set out this predator/producer distinction he was quickly ridiculed by commentators and savagely attacked by the Conservatives. His critics presented the Labour position as wanting to install some moral arbiter in the Treasury passing judgement on good and bad businesses - rewarding the former with tax breaks and punishing the latter with, well, who knows?

That, Labour insists, is a crude caricature of Miliband's argument, but privately senior party figures accept that they left themselves open to such an attack by failing to flesh out the idea in more detail and, crucially, by failing to follow up the leader's conference speech with more concrete examples of what he had in mind. Many in the shadow cabinet also feel that the speech itself suffered from being re-written too many times with input from too many people, so the core argument was buried in caveats and digressions.

Yesterday's speech was certainly clearer and more focused - a virtue, perhaps, of being dedicated to one subject and so relieved of the pressures of a leader's speech at a party conference, which, convention dictates, has to cover absolutely everything from foreign policy to lame jokes and semi-fictional anecdotes that "personalise" the policy along the lines "I met a brave woman in Dudley ... her struggle demonstrates why ..."

Miliband is not a natural performer, so that idiom doesn't suit him. He is more effective when simply making a straight argument, as he did yesterday, although of course far fewer people are listening when it is just another speech on a Thursday lunchtime. Miliband is also helped by having Chuka Umunna installed as his shadow Business Secretary, making very much the same argument, as he did in a speech on Monday. Umunna is young, unfamiliar to the voters - so can plausibly represent a new chapter in the Labour story - and a fluent television performer. When he was elevated to the shadow cabinet last month there was a fair amount of whispering about over-promotion (he was elected to parliament in 2010). It is fair to say that Umunna's rapid rise and supreme confidence have ruffled a few feathers. Politics, like every other profession, is hardly free from envy. But many critics are already being swayed by what is generally felt to be an assured start by the shadow business secretary.

An essential part of Umunna's brief is to go around persuading businesses small and large - and the City - that Labour has a credible position not just an elaborate whinge. In that respect, his youth is a handicap. Business audiences are always deeply suspicious of politicians who have no experience of enterprise themselves ... which, these days, is most of them. George Osborne was routinely dismissed as a lightweight until the moment he became Chancellor.

For Labour this is a particular problem as the party is dominated by career politicians and people who have risen up through the trade union movement. It was a noticeable feature of the party's conference this year that hardly anyone spoke from the platform with long experience of the private sector. It is a gap that Ed Miliband urgently needs to fill, both in the way the party presents itself to the public and on his own staff. He is getting better at explaining his "predatory v productive capitalism" idea, but that will have limited effect unless it is bolstered by actual business people saying the same thing. Speeches will never be enough. He needs some heavyweight capitalists joining in to say, in effect, "yes, we are with Ed on this." And he needs someone in his immediate entourage, currently full of academics, think tankers and ex-journalists, who can bring the experience of running a business to the heart of the leader's operation. There are ethical, conscientious, socially responsible entrepreneurs out there. Ed Miliband needs to be recruiting them as evangelists for Labour's vision of a better capitalism. Otherwise his position on the economy will struggle to graduate from being an abstract critique to being a serious political proposition.

Rafael Behr is political columnist at the Guardian and former political editor of the New Statesman

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25 times people used Brexit to attack Muslims since the EU referendum

Some voters appear more interested in expelling Muslims than EU red tape.

In theory, voting for Brexit because you were worried about immigration has nothing to do with Islamophobia. It’s about migrant workers from Eastern Europe undercutting wages. Or worries about border controls. Or the housing crisis. 

The reports collected by an anti-Muslim attack monitor tell a different story. 

Every week, the researchers at Tell Mama receive roughly 40-50 reports of Islamophobic incidences.

But after the EU referendum, they recorded 30 such incidents in three days alone. And many were directly related to Brexit. 

Founder Fiyaz Mughal said there had been a cluster of hate crimes since the vote:

“The Brexit vote seems to have given courage to some with deeply prejudicial and bigoted views that they can air them and target them at predominantly Muslim women and visibly different settled communities.”

Politicians have appeared concerned. On Monday, as MPs grappled with the aftermath of the referendum, the Prime Minister David Cameron stated “loud and clear” that: “Just because we are leaving the European Union, it will not make us a less tolerant, less diverse nation.”

But condemning single racist incidents is easier than taking a political position that appeases the majority and protects the minority at the same time. 

As the incidents recorded make clear, the aggressors made direct links between their vote and the racial abuse they were now publicly shouting.

The way they told it, they had voted for Muslims to “leave”. 
 
Chair of Tell Mama and former Labour Justice and Communities Minister, Shahid Malik, said:

“With the backdrop of the Brexit vote and the spike in racist incidents that seems to be emerging, the government should be under no illusions, things could quickly become
extremely unpleasant for Britain’s minorities.

“So today more than ever, we need our government, our political parties and of course our media to act with the utmost responsibility and help steer us towards a post-Brexit Britain where xenophobia and hatred are utterly rejected.”

Here are the 25 events that were recorded between 24 and 27 June that directly related to Brexit. Please be aware that some of the language is offensive:

  1. A Welsh Muslim councillor was told to pack her bags and leave.
  2. A man in a petrol station shouted: "You're an Arabic c**t, you're a terrorist" at an Arab driver and stated he “voted them out”. 
  3. A Barnsley man was told to leave and that the aggressor’s parents had voted for people like him to be kicked out.
  4. A woman witnessed a man making victory signs at families at a school where a majority of students are Muslim.
  5. A man shouted, “you f**king Muslim, f**king EU out,” to a woman in Kingston, London. 
  6. An Indian man was called “p**i c**t in a suit” and told to “leave”.
  7. Men circled a Muslim woman in Birmingham and shouted: “Get out - we voted Leave.”
  8. A British Asian mother and her two children were told: "Today is the day we get rid of the likes of you!" by a man who then spat at her. 
  9. A man tweeted that his 13-year-old brother received chants of “bye, bye, you’re going home”.
  10. A van driver chanted “out, out, out”, at a Muslim woman in Broxley, Luton
  11. Muslims in Nottingham were abused in the street with chants of: “Leave Europe. Kick out the Muslims.”
  12. A Muslim woman at King’s Cross, London, had “BREXIT” yelled in her face.
  13. A man in London called a South Asian woman “foreigner” and commented about UKIP.
  14. A man shouted “p**i” and “leave now” at individuals in a London street.
  15. A taxi driver in the West Midlands told a woman his reason for voting Leave was to “get rid of people like you”.
  16. An Indian cyclist was verbally abused and told to “leave now”. 
  17. A man on a bike swore at a Muslim family and muttered something about voting.
  18. In Newport, a Muslim family who had not experienced any trouble before had their front door kicked in.
  19. A South Asian woman in Manchester was told to “speak clearly” and then told “Brexit”. 
  20. A Sikh doctor was told by a patient: “Shouldn’t you be on a plane back to Pakistan? We voted you out.”
  21. An abusive tweet read: “Thousands of raped little White girls by Muslims mean nothing to Z….#Brexit”.
  22. A group of men abused a South Asian man by calling him a “p**i c**t” and telling him to go home after Brexit.
  23. A man shouted at a taxi driver in Derby: "Brexit, you p**i.”
  24. Two men shouted at a Muslim woman walking towards a mosque “muzzies out” and “we voted for you being out.”
  25. A journalist was called a “p**i” in racial abuse apparently linked to Brexit.