Cameron and Merkel fail to progress

The pair's smiles couldn't disguise the level of disagreement.

After this week's war of words over an EU Robin Hood Tax, David Cameron and Angela Merkel were all smiles at their press conference in Berlin. But their avowals of friendship ("we are very good friends," said Cameron, protesting rather too much) couldn't disguise the level of disagreement between the pair. On the Tobin tax itself, Merkel admitted that while they both favoured a global transactions tax they had made "no progress" on a European version. Unlike the German Chancellor, Cameron and George Osborne, who has described the proposed EU tax as "a bullet aimed at the heart of London", remain unwilling to introduce it without the agreement of China and the US.

Worse, Merkel restated Germany's opposition to the use of the European Central Bank as a lender of last resort. She spoke of the need for European leaders to use all available "weapons" to defend the single currency but added: "one should also not pretend to be more powerful than one is"

Cameron spoke simply of the need for all eurozone countries to show a "commitment to fiscal discipline", refusing to acknowledge that austerity has failed in Europe. As historian Richard J Evans argues in his magisterial essay in this week's New Statesman: "German-style fiscal discipline is all very well but it is not going to solve anything in the short run." But both Cameron and Merkel remain unwilling to grasp the nettle.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Getty
Show Hide image

The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.