Cameron and Merkel fail to progress

The pair's smiles couldn't disguise the level of disagreement.

After this week's war of words over an EU Robin Hood Tax, David Cameron and Angela Merkel were all smiles at their press conference in Berlin. But their avowals of friendship ("we are very good friends," said Cameron, protesting rather too much) couldn't disguise the level of disagreement between the pair. On the Tobin tax itself, Merkel admitted that while they both favoured a global transactions tax they had made "no progress" on a European version. Unlike the German Chancellor, Cameron and George Osborne, who has described the proposed EU tax as "a bullet aimed at the heart of London", remain unwilling to introduce it without the agreement of China and the US.

Worse, Merkel restated Germany's opposition to the use of the European Central Bank as a lender of last resort. She spoke of the need for European leaders to use all available "weapons" to defend the single currency but added: "one should also not pretend to be more powerful than one is"

Cameron spoke simply of the need for all eurozone countries to show a "commitment to fiscal discipline", refusing to acknowledge that austerity has failed in Europe. As historian Richard J Evans argues in his magisterial essay in this week's New Statesman: "German-style fiscal discipline is all very well but it is not going to solve anything in the short run." But both Cameron and Merkel remain unwilling to grasp the nettle.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.