Pick of the week

Best of NS in print and online.

From the magazine

1. Strictly come learning

Samira Shackle meets the new head of Ofsted, Michael Wilshaw.

2. Cameron has outsourced worrying about compassion. He'll regret it

Iain Duncan Smith's fretting about poverty is no replacement for an empathetic prime minister, writes Rafael Behr.

3. Don't be deceived by the myth of Mitt Romney's moderation

The former Massachusetts governor defends the interests of the rich and powerful at all costs, writes Mehdi Hasan.

4. Why aren't women funny on TV?

All-male panel show line-ups are making me lose my sense of humour, says Helen Lewis-Hasteley.

5. The NS Profile -- Claire Tomalin

The award-winning writer and former New Statesman literary editor hangs up her biographer's coat with a life of Dickens . . . and contemplates one of her own. By Sophie Elmhirst.

 

From the web

1. There was too much mystery for Downing Street to bear

Rafael Behr on Liam Fox's protracted departure.

2. Obama: Mr 99%?

Gavin Kelly says the US president needs to recognise the resentments that have sparked the 99% movement.

3. The world according to Paul Dacre

The Daily Mail editor on corrections, self-regulation and liberals who loathe the tabloids. By Steven Baxter.

4. NHS reform is a never-ending nightmare for Cameron

The Prime Minister could end up with a reputation as the man who broke the NHS, writes Rafael Behr.

5. Hitchens: "I'm not going to quit until I absolutely have to"

Writer makes first public appearance for months in Texas, notes George Eaton.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.