98 of FTSE 100 companies use tax havens

New research by ActionAid uncovers 8,492 overseas subsidiary companies.

Every single company on the London Stock Exchange, bar two, uses round-the-world tax havens, often costing developing countries far more than they receive annually in aid, a report by ActionAid has revealed.

Ninety-eight per cent of the country's biggest businesses are afforded widespread financial secrecy and tax levies by holding jurisdictions in 8,492 companies outside of the UK. This makes up a quarter of the FTSE 100's total 34,000 subsidiaries.

The four big banks (Barclays, HSBC, Lloyds and RBS) alone have 1,649 firms located in tax havens.

ActionAid's research is based on previously undisclosed data. FTSE companies are required by law to disclosed information on their subsidiary businesses, however, ActionAid's analysis found that over half "were not complying with this legal obligation". The child sponsorship chairty submitted complaints to Companies House, thereby forcing Stock Exchange businesses to re-file their annual returns.

A graphic map of the FTSE 100 tax havens can be found on the ActionAid website, here.

Alice Gribbin is a Teaching-Writing Fellow at the Iowa Writers' Workshop. She was formerly the editorial assistant at the New Statesman.

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.