In this week's New Statesman: Which Tories is it OK to love?

The left's favourite Tories | Phillip Blond on Cameron's failures | John Gray on Christopher Hitchen

A

In this week's New Statesman, as part of our Conservative conference special we ask eight progressives to nominate their favourite Tory, with choices including David Marquand on Harold Macmillan, Andrew Adonis on Michael Heseltine and Maurice Glasman on Edmund Burke. Pick up a copy of the magazine to see who chose David Maxwell Fyfe and Margaret Thatcher.

Also this week, Conservative guru and author of the 2009 Red Tory thesis Phillip Blond outlines the party's missed opportunities, the ruin of the 'Big Society' and how David Cameron is failing the poor. Tory MP Louise Mensch talks to Jon Bernstein about her past attraction to New Labour, Nadine Dorries and abortion, and her next chick-lit novel, and Rafael Behr reports on restlessness in the coalition cabinet.

Elsewhere, following the Labour leader's conference speech, Mehdi Hasan plots the future for Ed Miliband, David Blanchflower considers the upside of the eurozone crisis for Britain, and Ben Smith writes from Washington on Elizabeth Warren, the grandmother taking on Wall Street and bringing hope to the US left.

All this plus an Autumn books special featuring John Gray on Christopher Hitchens's Arguably, James Ball on the Julian Assange autobiography, and Shakespeare scholar Jonathan Bate on our obsession with the Tudors.

Alice Gribbin is a Teaching-Writing Fellow at the Iowa Writers' Workshop. She was formerly the editorial assistant at the New Statesman.

Getty
Show Hide image

Jeremy Corbyn will stay on the Labour leadership ballot paper, judge rules

Labour donor Michael Foster had challenged the decision at the High Court.

The High Court has ruled that Jeremy Corbyn should be allowed to automatically run again for Labour leader after the decision of the party's National Executive Committee was challenged. 

Corbyn declared it a "waste of time" and an attempt to overturn the right of Labour members to choose their leader.

The decision ends the hope of some anti-Corbyn Labour members that he could be excluded from the contest altogether.

The legal challenge had been brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate, who maintained he was simply seeking the views of experts.

But when the experts spoke, it was in Corbyn's favour. 

The ruling said: "Accordingly, the Judge accepted that the decision of the NEC was correct and that Mr Corbyn was entitled to be a candidate in the forthcoming election without the need for nominations."

This judgement was "wholly unaffected by political considerations", it added. 

Corbyn said: "I welcome the decision by the High Court to respect the democracy of the Labour Party.

"This has been a waste of time and resources when our party should be focused on holding the government to account.

"There should have been no question of the right of half a million Labour party members to choose their own leader being overturned. If anything, the aim should be to expand the number of voters in this election. I hope all candidates and supporters will reject any attempt to prolong this process, and that we can now proceed with the election in a comradely and respectful manner."

Iain McNicol, general secretary of the Labour Party, said: “We are delighted that the Court has upheld the authority and decision of the National Executive Committee of the Labour Party. 

“We will continue with the leadership election as agreed by the NEC."

If Corbyn had been excluded, he would have had to seek the nomination of 51 MPs, which would have been difficult since just 40 voted against the no confidence motion in him. He would therefore have been effectively excluded from running. 

Owen Smith, the candidate backed by rebel MPs, told the BBC earlier he believed Corbyn should stay on the ballot paper. 

He said after the judgement: “I’m pleased the court has done the right thing and ruled that Jeremy should be on the ballot. This now puts to bed any questions about the process, so we can get on with discussing the issues that really matter."

The news was greeted with celebration by Corbyn supporters.