A 9/11 reader

Ten of the best articles on the tenth anniversary of the attack.

In the morning of September 11, 2001, 19 hijackers took control of four commercial airliners, piloting two in to the World Trade Center in Manhattan, and another into the Pentagon in Washington. The final plane, United 93, was brought down by passengers in Pennsylvania.

Some 2,977 people died as a result, as well as the 19 hijackers. To commemorate the tenth anniversary of the attacks, here are ten articles - old and new - giving a range of perspectives on those events.

1. Where were you on 9/11?

For its 9/11 special issue, the NS asked politicians, writers and other leading figures for their memories of the day. From Rory Stewart in Nepal to Stephen Evans in the World Trade Center, they provide a fascinating insight into the day that defined a generation.

2. Ten Years On: Your Memories

In recent days, The Guardian has tried a unique crowd-sourcing project, inviting readers to submit their own remembrances of the day. The result is a far more international perspective on the attacks than many other media outlets have managed.

3. Simply Evil

Christopher Hitchens's thinking was profoundly affected by the events of September 11 (more here). This is his response to the anniversary.

4. How the fear of being criminalised has forced Muslims into silence

Mehdi Hasan on the demonisation of Muslims. . .

5. "You no longer have rights"

. . . and three incredible stories of discrimination, collected by McSweeneys.

6. The Falling Man

One of the most acclaimed pieces of journalism to follow the attacks, this piece tried to trace the identity of the man pictured falling from the burning Towers.

7. Perpetual warfare

John Gray puts the attacks in a wider historical conflict, exploring the decade of conflict which began in 2001.

8. How to write a horror film and How did Hollywood handle the tragedy?

Two film critics assess the cinematic response.

9. The Twins of the Twin Towers

Of the 3,000 who died in the towers, 46 were twins. In the Daily Mail, the survivors tell their story.

10. The day that changed my city

In a moving piece, the Independent's David Usborne relives the day in Manhattan, and explores why he dreads its anniversary so much.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

This article first appeared in the 05 September 2011 issue of the New Statesman, 9/11

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Who will win the Copeland by-election?

Labour face a tricky task in holding onto the seat. 

What’s the Copeland by-election about? That’s the question that will decide who wins it.

The Conservatives want it to be about the nuclear industry, which is the seat’s biggest employer, and Jeremy Corbyn’s long history of opposition to nuclear power.

Labour want it to be about the difficulties of the NHS in Cumbria in general and the future of West Cumberland Hospital in particular.

Who’s winning? Neither party is confident of victory but both sides think it will be close. That Theresa May has visited is a sign of the confidence in Conservative headquarters that, win or lose, Labour will not increase its majority from the six-point lead it held over the Conservatives in May 2015. (It’s always more instructive to talk about vote share rather than raw numbers, in by-elections in particular.)

But her visit may have been counterproductive. Yes, she is the most popular politician in Britain according to all the polls, but in visiting she has added fuel to the fire of Labour’s message that the Conservatives are keeping an anxious eye on the outcome.

Labour strategists feared that “the oxygen” would come out of the campaign if May used her visit to offer a guarantee about West Cumberland Hospital. Instead, she refused to answer, merely hyping up the issue further.

The party is nervous that opposition to Corbyn is going to supress turnout among their voters, but on the Conservative side, there is considerable irritation that May’s visit has made their task harder, too.

Voters know the difference between a by-election and a general election and my hunch is that people will get they can have a free hit on the health question without risking the future of the nuclear factory. That Corbyn has U-Turned on nuclear power only helps.

I said last week that if I knew what the local paper would look like between now and then I would be able to call the outcome. Today the West Cumbria News & Star leads with Downing Street’s refusal to answer questions about West Cumberland Hospital. All the signs favour Labour. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.