Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The immigration triffid is growing. Eradicate it (Times) (£)

Even the Labour leader seems to believe - wrongly - that foreigners (a) take British jobs and (b) drive down wages. David Aaronovitch calls for a change.

2. Now Ed Miliband's challenge is to put his stamp on his Labour party (Guardian)

After the most radical speech by a leader for a generation, Miliband must turn the brave talk into a winning platform, says Seumas Milne.

3. Tentative progress, but Germany remains the key (Independent)

This leading article urges that the fact that the solution to the crisis is more Europe, rather than less, should not be lost in the rhetoric.

4. The best way to tackle the Big Four (Financial Times)

John Gapper argues that it would be better to encourage the emergence of new competitors to the biggest firms through ownership and anti-trust measures.

5. You don't always win on moral high ground (Times) (£)

In business you have to take unpopular decisions. James Dyson argues that that doesn't mean they're wrong.

6. A Robin Hood tax could turn the banks from villains to heroes (Guardian)

An EU-wide Robin Hood tax is close to becoming reality, says Bill Nighy. Cameron must now tell the City to get on board.

7. Failed by the very people who are there to protect us (Independent)

Yvette Cooper has done a good thing in setting up an independent review of policing, says Andreas Whittam Smith.

8. Cameron has lost his way on crime (Financial Times)

The Conservatives traditionally flew the flag for law and order. The sad reality is that this flag is flying at half-mast, writes Paul McKeever.

9. Children First (Times) (£)

More children are being taken into care, and fewer are adopted. This leading article says that the adoption system has grown worse, not better.

10. Regeneration? What's happening in Sheffield's Park Hill is class cleansing (Guardian)

Once unpicturesque council tenants have been 'decanted', inner-city estates can be safely claimed by the affluent, says Owen Hatherley.

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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.