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Morning call: the pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Out of the 'zone', but still in the soup (Independent on Sunday)

The problems of the euro could sink even those who wanted nothing to do with it, such as the Conservative Party, writes John Rentoul.

2. The banks will be forced to STOP gambling with your money... and they can meet the costs (Mail on Sunday)

Vince Cable pens an-oped.

3. Different century, same old friendship (Independent on Sunday)

In the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 attacks a new generation felt the emotional attachment between the UK and US, writes Louis B Susman, the US ambassador to the UK.

4. The fate of the Government is in George Osborne's hands (Sunday Telegraph)

In his Autumn Statement, the Chancellor must face down the Lib Dems, and set out a strategy to rescue us from economic ruin, argues Tim Montgomerie.

5. A simple truth to kill the big lie about 9/11 (Sunday Times) (£)

The lesson from September 11, 2001, is never ignore the obvious -- there is simply no need to introduce complexities to understand it, writes Christopher Hitchens.

6. The American dream, and the missing years (Independent on Sunday)

The terror attacks of 2001 ushered in a decade of wars that shattered Iraq and Afghanistan, leaving the world's only superpower robbed of its confidence and stripped of its illusions, writes Rupert Cornwell.

7. Stroppy Tories seem to have forgotten they didn't actually win (Observer)

Nick Clegg is delighted when Conservatives complain that he's stopping them from being more rightwing, writes Andrew Rawnsley.

8. While Galliano's outburst is publicly condemned, 'hate speech' becomes an online norm (Sunday Telegraph)

In our curiously fractured society, moving from offline to online discourse is like ricocheting from Switzerland to the Wild West, says Jenny McCartney.

9. And the award for the most pointless award goes to... GQ for naming George Osborne as the Politician of the Year! (Mail on Sunday)

Suzanne Moore is unimpressed with George Osborne's performance at the ceremony.

10. And Hate Begat Hate (New York Times)

The wave of anti-Americanism is rising in both Afghanistan and Pakistan, even among many who once admired the United States, writes Ahmed Rashid.