Vince Cable's speech to conference: Live blog

The Business Secretary addresses Liberal Democrat delegates in Birmingham.

QUICK VERDICT: Cable's delivery today was low-key, but were some unmistakeable jibes at the Tories -- the repeated references to fairness, stimulus, and, of course, the reference to the "ideological descendants of those who sent children up chimneys". There was also a sprinkling of Lib Dem populism with the emphasis on social justice, and fairness -- particularly on limiting executive pay and taxing the rich. Notably, he didn't use the Jaguar and Landrover contracts he opened with to say that the economy was on the home-stretch; nor did he indicate that the next phase of difficulty for ordinary citizens is going to be over any time soon.

12.37: Cable has reiterated his commitment to a mansion tax. "When some critics attack our party policy of a tax on properties over £2 million by saying it is an attack on ordinary middle class owners, you wonder what part of the solar system they live in." Greater tax of land and property was a key theme of his speech last year.

12.36: He keeps returning to the idea of "responsible capitalism".

12.35: "Some of you may have noticed one of the big media companies has had a spot of bother" -- Cable makes a nod to his anti-Murdoch stance without courting controversy too much.

12.32: Living costs are falling, he says, and there is a sense of grievance that workers are paying for a crisis they did not create.

12.31: Cable is talking about investment in infrastructure -- the "stimulus" section of his speech. It's not a word used often by George Osborne, it must be said.

12.29: How do we progress from financial stability to growth, asks Cable. "Panic in the markets will not be stopped by stopping maternity rights," says Cable, assuring delegates he will not provide cover for unscrupulous business-people -- the "ideological descendents of those who sent children up chimneys". This is a jibe at Steve Hilton for some of his more unconventional ideas on workers' rights.

12.26: Cable is criticising the idea that cutting taxes for the wealthy will improve the country's wealth. On the idea that this will encourage tax avoiders back from Monaco, he says: "Pull the other one". Playing to the Lib Dem faithful here.

12.23pm: Vince Cable is calling for "stability, stimulus, and solidarity" to help the economy recover and create a "responsible capitalism". He is criticising Labour's record and saying that financial discipline is not necessarily "right-wing" or "ideological". He says he thinks they are following in the steps of Roy Jenkins. "The progressive agenda of centre left parties cannot be cannot be delivered by bankrupt governments" -- but the really important word here is "stimulus".

12.05pm: Join us at 12.20pm for live updates on Vince Cable's speech. You can read the full transcript of it here.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Michael Gove definitely didn't betray anyone, says Michael Gove

What's a disagreement among friends?

Michael Gove is certainly not a traitor and he thinks Theresa May is absolutely the best leader of the Conservative party.

That's according to the cast out Brexiteer, who told the BBC's World At One life on the back benches has given him the opportunity to reflect on his mistakes. 

He described Boris Johnson, his one-time Leave ally before he decided to run against him for leader, as "phenomenally talented". 

Asked whether he had betrayed Johnson with his surprise leadership bid, Gove protested: "I wouldn't say I stabbed him in the back."

Instead, "while I intially thought Boris was the right person to be Prime Minister", he later came to the conclusion "he wasn't the right person to be Prime Minister at that point".

As for campaigning against the then-PM David Cameron, he declared: "I absolutely reject the idea of betrayal." Instead, it was a "disagreement" among friends: "Disagreement among friends is always painful."

Gove, who up to July had been a government minister since 2010, also found time to praise the person in charge of hiring government ministers, Theresa May. 

He said: "With the benefit of hindsight and the opportunity to spend some time on the backbenches reflecting on some of the mistakes I've made and some of the judgements I've made, I actually think that Theresa is the right leader at the right time. 

"I think that someone who took the position she did during the referendum is very well placed both to unite the party and lead these negotiations effectively."

Gove, who told The Times he was shocked when Cameron resigned after the Brexit vote, had backed Johnson for leader.

However, at the last minute he announced his candidacy, and caused an infuriated Johnson to pull his own campaign. Gove received just 14 per cent of the vote in the final contest, compared to 60.5 per cent for May. 


Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.