20 under 40: parliament's rising stars

This week's <em>New Statesman</em> profiles 20 MPs who are ambitious, ahead of the pack, and under t

The last election saw the arrival of 227 new MPs, the biggest rookie intake since 1997. The New Statesman, in association with Insight Public Affairs, has compiled a list of 20 MPs aged under 40 who we think have the brightest prospects in the House. The list excludes frontbenchers, although among them are sure to be future ministers and even prime ministers. As the NS leader notes this week: "so far, the 2010 generation has shown itself to be independent-minded and politically precocious, with a reassuring tendency to defy the whips".

We will be following them and reporting back on their progress in the years ahead. For now, here is the list. You can read profiles of these MPs in this week's NS, currently available on the newsstands.

Rushanara Ali (Lab) - born 1975

Luciana Berger (Lab) - 1981

Rehman Chishti (Con) - 1978

Stella Creasy (Lab) - 1977

Michael Dugher (Lab) - 1975

Sam Gyimah (Con) - 1976

Duncan Hames (Lib Dem) - 1977

Matthew Hancock (Con) - 1978

Tristram Hunt (Lab) - 1974

Jo Johnson (Con) - 1971

Gregg McClymont (Lab) - 1976

Lisa Nandy (Lab) - 1979

Priti Patel (Con) - 1972

Dominic Raab (Con) - 1974

Rachel Reeves (Lab) - 1979

Rory Stewart (Con) - 1973

Jo Swinson (Lib Dem) - 1980

Elizabeth Truss (Con) - 1975

Chuka Umunna (Lab) - 1978

John Woodcock (Lab) - 1978

 

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Donald Trump's healthcare failure could be to his advantage

The appearance of weakness is less electorally damaging than actually removing healthcare from millions of people.

Good morning. Is it all over for Donald Trump? His approval ratings have cratered to below 40%. Now his attempt to dismantle Barack Obama's healthcare reforms have hit serious resistance from within the Republican Party, adding to the failures and retreats of his early days in office.

The problem for the GOP is that their opposition to Obamacare had more to do with the word "Obama" than the word "care". The previous President opted for a right-wing solution to the problem of the uninsured in a doomed attempt to secure bipartisan support for his healthcare reform. The politician with the biggest impact on the structures of the Affordable Care Act is Mitt Romney.

But now that the Republicans control all three branches of government they are left in a situation where they have no alternative to Obamacare that wouldn't either a) shred conservative orthodoxies on healthcare or b) create numerous and angry losers in their constituencies. The difficulties for Trump's proposal is that it does a bit of both.

Now the man who ran on his ability to cut a deal has been forced to make a take it or leave plea to Republicans in the House of Representatives: vote for this plan or say goodbye to any chance of repealing Obamacare.

But that's probably good news for Trump. The appearance of weakness and failure is less electorally damaging than actually succeeding in removing healthcare from millions of people, including people who voted for Trump.

Trump won his first term because his own negatives as a candidate weren't quite enough to drag him down on a night when he underperformed Republican candidates across the country. The historical trends all make it hard for a first-term incumbent to lose. So far, Trump's administration is largely being frustrated by the Republican establishment though he is succeeding in leveraging the Presidency for the benefit of his business empire.

But it may be that in the failure to get anything done he succeeds in once again riding Republican coattails to victory in 2020.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.